The Rohingya

An Ethnography of 'Subhuman' Life

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199489350

Publication date:

10/08/2020

Hardback

268 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199489350

Publication date:

10/08/2020

Hardback

268 pages

Nasir Uddin

The book offers a comprehensive portrait of refugee life in modern nation-states illuminating their pains, sufferings, and struggle with the case of Rohingya people. The book with its ethnographically informed analysis proposes a new framework called 'subhuman' life for understanding the extreme vulnerability as well as genocide, ethnocide, ethnic cleansing, and domicide. The book attempts to present both a theoretical potential and an ethnography of Rohingya to the spectrum of stateless people, asylum seekers, transborder movements, camp people, and non-citizens.

Rights:  World Rights

Nasir Uddin

Description

The Rohingyas are one of the most persecuted ethnic minorities in the world. They used to live in the Arakan/Rakhine State of Burma/Myanmar for centuries, though it is a predominantly Buddhist country. Being victims of persecution as a result of ethnic cleansing and genocide, they started migrating to neighbouring countries from 1978, and after the massive migration August 2017 onwards, about 1.3 million Rohingyas now live in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh.

This book offers a comprehensive portrait of how the state becomes instrumental in producing 'stateless' people, wherein both Myanmar and Bangladesh alienate the Rohingyas as illegal migrants, and they have to face unemployment, mental and sexual abuse, and deprivation of basic human necessities. The Rohingya proposes a new framework and theoretical alternative called 'subhuman life' for understanding the extreme vulnerability of the people as well as the genocide, ethnocide, and domicide taking place in the region. With several concrete ethnographic evidences, Nasir Uddin, apart from reconstructing the Rohingyas' regional history, sheds light on possible solutions to their refugee crisis and examines the regional political dynamics, South and Southeast Asian geopolitics, and bilateral and multilateral interstate relations.

About the Author

Nasir Uddin is a professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Chittagong. He is also the visiting Research Fellow at the Department of Refugee Studies, University of Oxford, UK.

Nasir Uddin

Table of contents

Contents

Acknowledgments
Glossary
Abbreviation
List of tables
List of photographs

Chapter-one
Introduction: The Rohingya, their Textual (Re) presentation, and A Contextual Framing

Chapter-Two
Who are the Rohingyas? Life through Roshang, Arakan, and Rakhine state

Chapter-Three
Of Hurting and Hosting: The Rohingyas in the Place of Migration

Chapter-Four
State of Stateless People: The Struggle for Existence and the Cry for Survival

Chapter-Five
The (Re) production of Vulnerability: State in Everyday life of Stateless Rohingyas

Chapter-Six
The Story of the 'Subhuman' Life: Untold Pains and Miseries, and Uncertain Futures

Chapter-Seven
Theorizing 'Subhuman': Treatments of Rohingyas as if lesser than human being

Chapter-Eight
Conclusion: Looking forward

Bibliography
Appendix
Index

Nasir Uddin

Nasir Uddin

Nasir Uddin

Description

The Rohingyas are one of the most persecuted ethnic minorities in the world. They used to live in the Arakan/Rakhine State of Burma/Myanmar for centuries, though it is a predominantly Buddhist country. Being victims of persecution as a result of ethnic cleansing and genocide, they started migrating to neighbouring countries from 1978, and after the massive migration August 2017 onwards, about 1.3 million Rohingyas now live in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh.

This book offers a comprehensive portrait of how the state becomes instrumental in producing 'stateless' people, wherein both Myanmar and Bangladesh alienate the Rohingyas as illegal migrants, and they have to face unemployment, mental and sexual abuse, and deprivation of basic human necessities. The Rohingya proposes a new framework and theoretical alternative called 'subhuman life' for understanding the extreme vulnerability of the people as well as the genocide, ethnocide, and domicide taking place in the region. With several concrete ethnographic evidences, Nasir Uddin, apart from reconstructing the Rohingyas' regional history, sheds light on possible solutions to their refugee crisis and examines the regional political dynamics, South and Southeast Asian geopolitics, and bilateral and multilateral interstate relations.

About the Author

Nasir Uddin is a professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Chittagong. He is also the visiting Research Fellow at the Department of Refugee Studies, University of Oxford, UK.

Read More

Table of contents

Contents

Acknowledgments
Glossary
Abbreviation
List of tables
List of photographs

Chapter-one
Introduction: The Rohingya, their Textual (Re) presentation, and A Contextual Framing

Chapter-Two
Who are the Rohingyas? Life through Roshang, Arakan, and Rakhine state

Chapter-Three
Of Hurting and Hosting: The Rohingyas in the Place of Migration

Chapter-Four
State of Stateless People: The Struggle for Existence and the Cry for Survival

Chapter-Five
The (Re) production of Vulnerability: State in Everyday life of Stateless Rohingyas

Chapter-Six
The Story of the 'Subhuman' Life: Untold Pains and Miseries, and Uncertain Futures

Chapter-Seven
Theorizing 'Subhuman': Treatments of Rohingyas as if lesser than human being

Chapter-Eight
Conclusion: Looking forward

Bibliography
Appendix
Index

Read More