Schooling for All

Can We Neglect the Demand?

Price: 795.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199467051

Publication date:

30/07/2016

Hardback

256 pages

Price: 795.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199467051

Publication date:

30/07/2016

Hardback

256 pages

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

The volume critically analyses the primary drawbacks of the Indian education system—non-enrolment, dropouts, irregular attendance, and inadequate learning. It establishes the need to strongly encourage parents to recognize the importance of education for their children’s future. Arguing that supply-side strategies—free education, midday meals, opening more schools—have not proved effective since the problem of inadequate demand is much larger, the authors delineate the measures that are required to boost the demand for education in India.

Rights:  World Rights

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

Description

Does substantial expansion of educational facilities by itself create the required demand for education? Since demand for education depends on many socio-economic, political, and religious factors, is the supply of free schooling alone adequate? Schooling for All demonstrates that there is still a substantial need to create demand for schooling among all levels of society, especially in those socio-economic groups which are yet to see the importance of education.
The volume critically analyses the primary drawbacks of the Indian education system—non-enrolment, dropouts, irregular attendance, and inadequate learning. It establishes the need to strongly encourage parents to recognize the importance of education for their children’s future. Arguing that supply-side strategies—free education, midday meals, opening more schools—have not proved effective since the problem of inadequate demand is much larger, the authors delineate the measures that are required to boost the demand for education in India.

About the Author

V. Santhakumar is professor at Azim Premji University, Bengaluru.
Namita Gupta is a visiting faculty at Azim Premji University, Bengaluru.
Rama Murthy Sripada is Program Manager, Azim Premji Foundation, Bengaluru.

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

Table of contents


Foreword by Anurag Behar
Acknowledgements
List of Tables, Figures, and Boxes
List of Abbreviations
1. Introduction: The Need to Encourage All Parents to Use School Education
2. Who Drops Out of School?
3. Who Does Not Attend School Regularly?
4. Who Does Not Learn in Schools?
5. What May Dampen the Demand for Schooling?
6. Experiences from India and Abroad
7. Attempts to Create Demand
8. What We Have Learnt and What We Can Do
Appendix
References
Index
About the Authors

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

V. Santhakumar, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada

Description

Does substantial expansion of educational facilities by itself create the required demand for education? Since demand for education depends on many socio-economic, political, and religious factors, is the supply of free schooling alone adequate? Schooling for All demonstrates that there is still a substantial need to create demand for schooling among all levels of society, especially in those socio-economic groups which are yet to see the importance of education.
The volume critically analyses the primary drawbacks of the Indian education system—non-enrolment, dropouts, irregular attendance, and inadequate learning. It establishes the need to strongly encourage parents to recognize the importance of education for their children’s future. Arguing that supply-side strategies—free education, midday meals, opening more schools—have not proved effective since the problem of inadequate demand is much larger, the authors delineate the measures that are required to boost the demand for education in India.

About the Author

V. Santhakumar is professor at Azim Premji University, Bengaluru.
Namita Gupta is a visiting faculty at Azim Premji University, Bengaluru.
Rama Murthy Sripada is Program Manager, Azim Premji Foundation, Bengaluru.

Read More

Table of contents


Foreword by Anurag Behar
Acknowledgements
List of Tables, Figures, and Boxes
List of Abbreviations
1. Introduction: The Need to Encourage All Parents to Use School Education
2. Who Drops Out of School?
3. Who Does Not Attend School Regularly?
4. Who Does Not Learn in Schools?
5. What May Dampen the Demand for Schooling?
6. Experiences from India and Abroad
7. Attempts to Create Demand
8. What We Have Learnt and What We Can Do
Appendix
References
Index
About the Authors

Read More