Different Nationalisms

Bengal, 1905–1947

Price: 995.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199468232

Publication date:

01/11/2016

Hardback

440 pages

Price: 995.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199468232

Publication date:

01/11/2016

Hardback

440 pages

Semanti Ghosh

This book claims that there were many different nationalisms in colonial Bengal. It shows that Bengali Muslims were not opposed to Hindu–Muslim unity, but keen to work on this unity on a regional level. It also shows that Bengali Hindu nationalism was also not a homogeneous body of thought. The diverse responses to the claims of ‘difference’ raised by other communities produced deep internal variations within their community. Going beyond the Hindu–Muslim or nationalism–communalism binaries, this work opens up an unfamiliar terrain of hidden contestations over the idea of nation in colonial Bengal.

Rights:  World Rights

Semanti Ghosh

Description

The period between the partition of Bengal in 1905 and the Partition of India in 1947 was witness to a unique experience of ‘imagining’ nations in Bengal. With neither the Bengali Muslims nor the Bengali Hindus envisioning homogenous ideas about nationhood, many contesting and alternative visions emerged, both within and between the two communities. These ‘other’ nationalisms were not ‘anti-national’, but creeds of either a ‘federal Indian nation’ with ‘regional autonomy’, or a ‘regional nation’ on its own strength. In Different Nationalisms, Semanti Ghosh goes beyond the Muslim–Hindu and nationalism–communalism binaries to reveal an unfamiliar terrain of hidden contestations over the concept of nation in colonial Bengal. For several of these competing ideologies, Partition, rather than being an expected or even desired outcome, was an anti-climax in their long-drawn battle for a nation.

About the Author

Semanti Ghosh
is Senior Assistant Editor at Anandabazar Patrika in Kolkata, India. She earned her PhD in Modern South Asian History from Tufts University, Cambridge, USA. She has edited and authored books on partition and nationalism in Bengali.

Semanti Ghosh

Table of contents


List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Chapter One: Unity and Difference in a Divided Homeland, 1905–11
Chapter Two: Promises and Politics of a New Nation, 1912–25
Chapter Three: Politics of Enumeration and the Changing Nation, 1926–36
Chapter Four: Two Coalitions and Three Moments of Failure, 1937–45
Chapter Five: Pakistan, Partition, and the Province, 1946–7
Conclusion

Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Semanti Ghosh

Semanti Ghosh

Semanti Ghosh

Description

The period between the partition of Bengal in 1905 and the Partition of India in 1947 was witness to a unique experience of ‘imagining’ nations in Bengal. With neither the Bengali Muslims nor the Bengali Hindus envisioning homogenous ideas about nationhood, many contesting and alternative visions emerged, both within and between the two communities. These ‘other’ nationalisms were not ‘anti-national’, but creeds of either a ‘federal Indian nation’ with ‘regional autonomy’, or a ‘regional nation’ on its own strength. In Different Nationalisms, Semanti Ghosh goes beyond the Muslim–Hindu and nationalism–communalism binaries to reveal an unfamiliar terrain of hidden contestations over the concept of nation in colonial Bengal. For several of these competing ideologies, Partition, rather than being an expected or even desired outcome, was an anti-climax in their long-drawn battle for a nation.

About the Author

Semanti Ghosh
is Senior Assistant Editor at Anandabazar Patrika in Kolkata, India. She earned her PhD in Modern South Asian History from Tufts University, Cambridge, USA. She has edited and authored books on partition and nationalism in Bengali.

Read More

Table of contents


List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Chapter One: Unity and Difference in a Divided Homeland, 1905–11
Chapter Two: Promises and Politics of a New Nation, 1912–25
Chapter Three: Politics of Enumeration and the Changing Nation, 1926–36
Chapter Four: Two Coalitions and Three Moments of Failure, 1937–45
Chapter Five: Pakistan, Partition, and the Province, 1946–7
Conclusion

Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Read More