Conflict, Negotiation, and Coexistence

Rethinking Human–Elephant Relations in South Asia

Price: 995.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199467228

Publication date:

16/09/2016

Hardback

384 pages

Price: 995.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199467228

Publication date:

16/09/2016

Hardback

384 pages

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

The interconnections between humans and elephants in South Asia are remarkably complex both naturally and culturally, yet our understandings are typically framed in terms of animal ecologies or human histories. This tends to produce understandings that sideline one or the other species. In this book, however, social scientists, natural scientists, and humanities scholars come together to develop an integrated approach to understanding the often-problematic ways that humans and elephants exist together and influence each other.

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Rights:  World Rights

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

Description

As formidable instruments of war, they have changed the destinies of empires.
As marauding crop raiders, they are despised.
As an endangered species, they are cherished.

Numerous and often contrasting are the ways in which elephants have been regarded by humans across millennia. Today, with reduced forest cover, human population expansion, and increasing industrialization, interaction between the two species is unavoidable and conflict is not mere happenstance. What, then, is the future of this relationship?
In South Asia, human–elephant relationships resonate with cultural significance. From the importance of elephants in ancient texts to the role of mahouts over centuries, from discussions on de-extinction to accounts of intimate companionship, the essays in this book reveal the various dynamics of the relationship between two intelligent social mammals. Eschewing such binaries as human and animal or nature and culture, the essays present elephants as subjective agents who think, feel, and emote.
Conflict, Negotiation, and Coexistence underscores the fact that we cannot understand elephant habitat and behaviour in isolation from the humans that help configure it. Significantly, nor can we understand human political, economic, and social life without the elephants that shape and share the world with them.

About the Editors

Piers Locke
teaches anthropology at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. In 2015, he was a fellow at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, Munich, Germany.
Jane Buckingham teaches history at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She specializes in Indian history and has published on Indian colonial and post-colonial medicine and law, and on ancient Indian models of business ethics.

Kindly download the flyer for more details.

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

Table of contents


Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
List of Tables
Introduction: Conflict, Coexistence, and the Challenge of Rethinking Human–Elephant Relations
Piers Locke
Part One: Humans and Elephants through Time
1. The Human–Elephant Relationship through the Ages: A Brief Macro-Scale History
Raman Sukumar
2. Towards a Deep History of Mahouts
Thomas R. Trautmann
3. Science of Elephants in Kauṭilya’s Arthaśāstra
Patrick Olivelle
4. Symbolism and Power: Elephants and Gendered Authority in the Mughal World
Jane Buckingham
5. Trans-Species Colonial Fieldwork: Elephants as Instruments and Participants in Mid-Nineteenth-Century India
Julian Baker
6. The Hall of Extinct Monsters: Mammoths, Elephants, and Nature in the Palaeo-Future
Amy L. Fletcher
Part Two: Living with Elephants
7. Animals, Persons, Gods: Negotiating Ambivalent Relationships with Captive Elephants in Chitwan, Nepal
Piers Locke
8. Conduct and Collaboration in Human–Elephant Working Communities of Northeast India
Nicolas Lainé
9. Cultural Values and Practical Realities in Sri Lankan Human–Elephant Relations
Niclas Klixbüll
Part Three: Sharing Space with Elephants
10. Conservation and the History of Human–Elephant Relations in Sri Lanka
Charles Santiapillai and S. Wijeyamohan
11. Elephant–Human Dandi: How Humans and Elephants Move through the Fringes of Forest and Village
Paul G. Keil
12. Challenges of Coexistence: Human–Elephant Conflicts in Wayanad, Kerala, South India
Ursula Münster
13. Ethnic Diversity and Human–Elephant Conflict in the Nilgiris, South India
Tarsh Thekaekara and Thomas F. Thornton
Bibliography
About the Editors and Contributors
Index

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

Edited by Piers Locke and Jane Buckingham

Description

As formidable instruments of war, they have changed the destinies of empires.
As marauding crop raiders, they are despised.
As an endangered species, they are cherished.

Numerous and often contrasting are the ways in which elephants have been regarded by humans across millennia. Today, with reduced forest cover, human population expansion, and increasing industrialization, interaction between the two species is unavoidable and conflict is not mere happenstance. What, then, is the future of this relationship?
In South Asia, human–elephant relationships resonate with cultural significance. From the importance of elephants in ancient texts to the role of mahouts over centuries, from discussions on de-extinction to accounts of intimate companionship, the essays in this book reveal the various dynamics of the relationship between two intelligent social mammals. Eschewing such binaries as human and animal or nature and culture, the essays present elephants as subjective agents who think, feel, and emote.
Conflict, Negotiation, and Coexistence underscores the fact that we cannot understand elephant habitat and behaviour in isolation from the humans that help configure it. Significantly, nor can we understand human political, economic, and social life without the elephants that shape and share the world with them.

About the Editors

Piers Locke
teaches anthropology at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. In 2015, he was a fellow at the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, Munich, Germany.
Jane Buckingham teaches history at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. She specializes in Indian history and has published on Indian colonial and post-colonial medicine and law, and on ancient Indian models of business ethics.

Kindly download the flyer for more details.

Read More

Table of contents


Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
List of Tables
Introduction: Conflict, Coexistence, and the Challenge of Rethinking Human–Elephant Relations
Piers Locke
Part One: Humans and Elephants through Time
1. The Human–Elephant Relationship through the Ages: A Brief Macro-Scale History
Raman Sukumar
2. Towards a Deep History of Mahouts
Thomas R. Trautmann
3. Science of Elephants in Kauṭilya’s Arthaśāstra
Patrick Olivelle
4. Symbolism and Power: Elephants and Gendered Authority in the Mughal World
Jane Buckingham
5. Trans-Species Colonial Fieldwork: Elephants as Instruments and Participants in Mid-Nineteenth-Century India
Julian Baker
6. The Hall of Extinct Monsters: Mammoths, Elephants, and Nature in the Palaeo-Future
Amy L. Fletcher
Part Two: Living with Elephants
7. Animals, Persons, Gods: Negotiating Ambivalent Relationships with Captive Elephants in Chitwan, Nepal
Piers Locke
8. Conduct and Collaboration in Human–Elephant Working Communities of Northeast India
Nicolas Lainé
9. Cultural Values and Practical Realities in Sri Lankan Human–Elephant Relations
Niclas Klixbüll
Part Three: Sharing Space with Elephants
10. Conservation and the History of Human–Elephant Relations in Sri Lanka
Charles Santiapillai and S. Wijeyamohan
11. Elephant–Human Dandi: How Humans and Elephants Move through the Fringes of Forest and Village
Paul G. Keil
12. Challenges of Coexistence: Human–Elephant Conflicts in Wayanad, Kerala, South India
Ursula Münster
13. Ethnic Diversity and Human–Elephant Conflict in the Nilgiris, South India
Tarsh Thekaekara and Thomas F. Thornton
Bibliography
About the Editors and Contributors
Index

Read More