Colonial Archaeology in South Asia

The Legacy of Sir Mortimer Wheeler

Price: 795.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780195690774

Publication date:

17/10/2007

Hardback

Price: 795.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780195690774

Publication date:

17/10/2007

Hardback

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Suitable for: This book will interest scholars, teachers, and students of Indian history and archaeology, as well as anthropologists, art historians, and the interested reader.

Rights:  World Rights

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Description

This book discusses the practice and institutionalization of the discipline of archaeology under British rule and its current manifestations. Using Sir Mortimer Wheeler's tenure as the Director-General of the Archaeological Survey of India (1944—48), it assesses the extent to which colonial intervention shaped the nascent discipline in South Asia. The study investigates two important areas generally neglected in most histories of archaeology of the subcontinent–conservation practices and the display of archaeological artefacts in museums. It also examines topical questions like the government control of academic disciplines like archaeology and the role of the discipline in the postcolonial period. Ray also provides an overview of the major events and debates that emerged in the archaeology of the subcontinent leading up to the 1940s. She discusses the contemporary academic scenario, Wheeler's Indian contemporaries, his contributions to the study of the subject, and his agenda for the Archaeological Survey of India. In doing so, she highlights how his work and methodology continue to dominate the study of archaeology in the postcolonial period as well. The author draws on a wide range of source material, some being used for the first time–the archives of Archaeological Survey of India and Mortimer Wheeler's private papers– to present the changing paradigms within which the past has been studied.

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Himanshu Prabha Ray

Description

This book discusses the practice and institutionalization of the discipline of archaeology under British rule and its current manifestations. Using Sir Mortimer Wheeler's tenure as the Director-General of the Archaeological Survey of India (1944—48), it assesses the extent to which colonial intervention shaped the nascent discipline in South Asia. The study investigates two important areas generally neglected in most histories of archaeology of the subcontinent–conservation practices and the display of archaeological artefacts in museums. It also examines topical questions like the government control of academic disciplines like archaeology and the role of the discipline in the postcolonial period. Ray also provides an overview of the major events and debates that emerged in the archaeology of the subcontinent leading up to the 1940s. She discusses the contemporary academic scenario, Wheeler's Indian contemporaries, his contributions to the study of the subject, and his agenda for the Archaeological Survey of India. In doing so, she highlights how his work and methodology continue to dominate the study of archaeology in the postcolonial period as well. The author draws on a wide range of source material, some being used for the first time–the archives of Archaeological Survey of India and Mortimer Wheeler's private papers– to present the changing paradigms within which the past has been studied.

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