Gender, Medicine, and Society in Colonial India

Women’s Health Care in Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Bengal

Price: 895.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199468225

Publication date:

09/12/2016

Hardback

260 pages

Price: 895.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199468225

Publication date:

09/12/2016

Hardback

260 pages

Sujata Mukherjee

This manuscript analyses the interface between medicine and colonial society through the lens of gender. The work traces the growth of hospital medicine in nineteenth century Bengal and shows how it created a space—albeit small—for providing western health care to female patients. The book also explores the growth of Western medical education among women in Bengal.

Rights:  World Rights

Sujata Mukherjee

Description

British imperialism in India left in its wake the scars of many battles between the colonizer and the colonized. Intense hostilities were witnessed as each tried to prove its superiority in domains such as medicine, education, and law. Through the lens of gender politics, Sujata Mukherjee confronts these conflicts to reveal the contested ‘body’ of the Indian woman.
Focusing on hospital medicine and preventive medical care, Mukherjee traces the popularization of Western forms of medical care in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Bengal. She shows how it created a space—albeit small—for providing Western health care to female patients; for the first time, women could receive medical attention outside the purdah and zenana. However, there was a simultaneous discrediting of indigenous forms of medicine—such as Ayurveda and Unani—and their practitioners, who had once exercised significant influence.
The book also explores the growth of Western medical education among women in Bengal. Overcoming racial and gender discrimination, social taboos, and active opposition from authorities and their families, some remarkable women became doctors and practicing physicians. Aiding them in their long-drawn efforts were the Brahmo Samaj and several women’s organizations and agencies of the time.

About the Author

Sujata Mukherjee
is Professor, Department of History, and Dean of Arts Faculty, Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata. She was the ICCR Visiting Chair at Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand, between July and October 2016. The book also explores the growth of Western medical education among women in Bengal.

Sujata Mukherjee

Table of contents


Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Western Medicine, Hospitals, and Female Health in Nineteenth-Century Bengal
2. Medical Education and Emergence of Women Medics in Colonial Bengal
3. Modernizing Reproductive Health
4. Sexuality, Domesticity, and Health Advice for Women
5. Women’s Work and the Politics of Health
6. Public Health Administration, the Famine of 1943–4, and Impact on Women
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Sujata Mukherjee

Sujata Mukherjee

Sujata Mukherjee

Description

British imperialism in India left in its wake the scars of many battles between the colonizer and the colonized. Intense hostilities were witnessed as each tried to prove its superiority in domains such as medicine, education, and law. Through the lens of gender politics, Sujata Mukherjee confronts these conflicts to reveal the contested ‘body’ of the Indian woman.
Focusing on hospital medicine and preventive medical care, Mukherjee traces the popularization of Western forms of medical care in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Bengal. She shows how it created a space—albeit small—for providing Western health care to female patients; for the first time, women could receive medical attention outside the purdah and zenana. However, there was a simultaneous discrediting of indigenous forms of medicine—such as Ayurveda and Unani—and their practitioners, who had once exercised significant influence.
The book also explores the growth of Western medical education among women in Bengal. Overcoming racial and gender discrimination, social taboos, and active opposition from authorities and their families, some remarkable women became doctors and practicing physicians. Aiding them in their long-drawn efforts were the Brahmo Samaj and several women’s organizations and agencies of the time.

About the Author

Sujata Mukherjee
is Professor, Department of History, and Dean of Arts Faculty, Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata. She was the ICCR Visiting Chair at Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand, between July and October 2016. The book also explores the growth of Western medical education among women in Bengal.

Read More

Table of contents


Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Western Medicine, Hospitals, and Female Health in Nineteenth-Century Bengal
2. Medical Education and Emergence of Women Medics in Colonial Bengal
3. Modernizing Reproductive Health
4. Sexuality, Domesticity, and Health Advice for Women
5. Women’s Work and the Politics of Health
6. Public Health Administration, the Famine of 1943–4, and Impact on Women
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Read More