Dr Ambedkar and Democracy

An Anthology

Price: 850.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199483167

Publication date:

15/01/2018

Hardback

324 pages

Price: 850.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199483167

Publication date:

15/01/2018

Hardback

324 pages

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

This anthology comprises Ambedkar’s original writings including memorandums, speeches, lectures, and talks, from 1919 to 1956, and presents his views on some of the crucial issues of democracy, such as genuine and effective representation of minorities and other marginalized sections, challenges before Indian democracy, and the conditions essential for the success of democracy.

Rights:  World Rights

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

Description

A paramount representative of the ‘untouchables’ or Dalits in India, Dr B.R. Ambedkar (1891–1956) is known all over the world for his activism towards securing minority rights. However, academically, his image is restricted to that of a constitutionalist and a Dalit leader. Touching upon various facets of Ambedkar’s political philosophy, this volume focuses on Ambedkar’s idea of democracy, an area in which he worked considerably after the colonial rule in India came to an end. Ambedkar’s idea of democracy is not only reflected in his essays on the colonial rule but also in his writings submitted to the British during his engagement with the Constituent Assembly.
This anthology comprises Ambedkar’s original writings including memorandums, speeches, lectures, and talks, from 1919 to 1956, and presents his views on some of the crucial issues of democracy, such as genuine and effective representation of minorities and other marginalized sections, challenges before Indian democracy, and the conditions essential for the success of democracy.



Christophe Jaffrelot is senior research fellow, CERI-Sciences, Po/CNRS, Paris, France.
Narender Kumar is professor, Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

Table of contents


Foreword by Sukhadeo Thorat
Acknowledgements
Introduction by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

1. Evidence Before the Southborough Committee (27 January 1919)
2. Dr Ambedkar with the Simon Commission (17 May 1929)
3. On Village Panchayats Bill (October 1931–March 1933)
4. Democracy Must Give Respectful Hearing to All Who Are Worth Listening To (4 January 1938)
5. If Democracy Dies It Will Be Our Doom (18–20 July 1942)
6. Objections to Cripps’ Proposals (20 July 1942)
7. Indians’ Destiny Is Bound Up with The Victory of Democracy (28 July 1942)
8. Separate Settlements (1 September 1943)
9. Labour and Parliamentary Democracy (17 September 1943)
10. Newspaper in a Modern Democratic System Is Fundamental Basis of Good Government (2 October 1944)
11. Communal Deadlock and a Way to Solve It (6 May 1945)
12. Resolution Regarding Aims and Objects (7 December 1946)
13. States and Minorities (15 March 1947)
14. Draft Constitution—Discussion (4 November 1948–25 November 1949)
15. Buddhism Paved Way for Democracy and Socialistic Pattern of Society (6 June 1950)
16. Failure of Parliamentary Democracy Will Result in Rebellion, Anarchy and Communism (28 October 1951)
17. If Our True Representatives Are Not Elected, Independence Will Be a Farce (28 October 1951)
18. Conditions Precedent for the Successful Working of Democracy (22 December 1952)
19. My Philosophy of Life (3 October 1954)
20. Constitution (Fourth Amendment) Bill, 1954 (19 March 1955)
21. Why I Like Buddhism (12 May 1956)
22. Prospects of Democracy in India (20 May 1956)
23. Brahma Is Not Dharma. What Good Is Brahma? (Undated)

Index
About the Editors

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

Features

  • Brings together Dr B.R. Ambedkar's works on the theme of democracy
  • Helps put in context Ambedkar's arguments and perceptions within contemporary debates on democracy
  • Helps think through contemporary political debates in the country within the context of Ambedkar's thoughts on democracy

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

Edited by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

Description

A paramount representative of the ‘untouchables’ or Dalits in India, Dr B.R. Ambedkar (1891–1956) is known all over the world for his activism towards securing minority rights. However, academically, his image is restricted to that of a constitutionalist and a Dalit leader. Touching upon various facets of Ambedkar’s political philosophy, this volume focuses on Ambedkar’s idea of democracy, an area in which he worked considerably after the colonial rule in India came to an end. Ambedkar’s idea of democracy is not only reflected in his essays on the colonial rule but also in his writings submitted to the British during his engagement with the Constituent Assembly.
This anthology comprises Ambedkar’s original writings including memorandums, speeches, lectures, and talks, from 1919 to 1956, and presents his views on some of the crucial issues of democracy, such as genuine and effective representation of minorities and other marginalized sections, challenges before Indian democracy, and the conditions essential for the success of democracy.



Christophe Jaffrelot is senior research fellow, CERI-Sciences, Po/CNRS, Paris, France.
Narender Kumar is professor, Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.

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Table of contents


Foreword by Sukhadeo Thorat
Acknowledgements
Introduction by Christophe Jaffrelot and Narender Kumar

1. Evidence Before the Southborough Committee (27 January 1919)
2. Dr Ambedkar with the Simon Commission (17 May 1929)
3. On Village Panchayats Bill (October 1931–March 1933)
4. Democracy Must Give Respectful Hearing to All Who Are Worth Listening To (4 January 1938)
5. If Democracy Dies It Will Be Our Doom (18–20 July 1942)
6. Objections to Cripps’ Proposals (20 July 1942)
7. Indians’ Destiny Is Bound Up with The Victory of Democracy (28 July 1942)
8. Separate Settlements (1 September 1943)
9. Labour and Parliamentary Democracy (17 September 1943)
10. Newspaper in a Modern Democratic System Is Fundamental Basis of Good Government (2 October 1944)
11. Communal Deadlock and a Way to Solve It (6 May 1945)
12. Resolution Regarding Aims and Objects (7 December 1946)
13. States and Minorities (15 March 1947)
14. Draft Constitution—Discussion (4 November 1948–25 November 1949)
15. Buddhism Paved Way for Democracy and Socialistic Pattern of Society (6 June 1950)
16. Failure of Parliamentary Democracy Will Result in Rebellion, Anarchy and Communism (28 October 1951)
17. If Our True Representatives Are Not Elected, Independence Will Be a Farce (28 October 1951)
18. Conditions Precedent for the Successful Working of Democracy (22 December 1952)
19. My Philosophy of Life (3 October 1954)
20. Constitution (Fourth Amendment) Bill, 1954 (19 March 1955)
21. Why I Like Buddhism (12 May 1956)
22. Prospects of Democracy in India (20 May 1956)
23. Brahma Is Not Dharma. What Good Is Brahma? (Undated)

Index
About the Editors

Read More