Contested Knowledge

Science, Media, and Democracy in Kerala

Price: 995.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199469123

Publication date:

30/12/2016

Hardback

308 pages

Price: 995.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199469123

Publication date:

30/12/2016

Hardback

308 pages

Shiju Sam Varughese

This work challenges the general perception that mass media fails to communicate scientific studies and research to the public. Through detailed case studies of journalistic presentation of science news in regional newspapers in Kerala, the book demonstrates that mass media has a rather complex relationship with science in contemporary democracies. The social dynamics of their mutual resonance and its impact on public engagement with science is the key emphasis of the book.

Rights:  World Rights

Shiju Sam Varughese

Description

Science communication, once the exclusive preserve of a scientific elite, has not been immune to the growing influence of mass media over society. As mass media becomes the most prominent site of public deliberation over science, multiple voices—both expert and non-expert—have begun to emerge, rewriting the social contract of science.
In the new millennium, the Indian state of Kerala saw a number of scientific controversies being discussed in the regional newspapers. Set against the backdrop of case studies of three major public controversies, Contested Knowledge explores how these mediated disputes brought the otherwise hidden dynamics of scientific knowledge production into full public view. It examines critical questions about ‘medialized science’, such as: What is a scientific-citizenry? How did a ‘scientific public sphere’ develop in Kerala? How does public contestation of knowledge contribute to deliberative democracy by re-instilling politics into science? Are there limits to such a democratization of science?
A fascinating commentary on the relation between science and society, this volume is a pioneering work that analyses the science–media–public interaction in a non-Western context.

About the Author

Shiju Sam Varughese
is Assistant Professor, Centre for Studies in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, School of Social Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, India. His research is in the field of Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Studies. He is particularly interested in media and science communication, public engagement with science and technology, social history of knowledge, cultural studies of science and technology, and regional modernities in South Asia. He has edited (with Satheese Chandra Bose) Kerala Modernity: Ideas, Spaces and Practices in Transition (2015).

Shiju Sam Varughese

Table of contents


Foreword by Dhruv Raina
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations

1. Introduction
2. Science, Media, Risk Politics: Constructing a Scientific Public Sphere
3. Mediating Science: Scientific-Citizen Public and the Regional Press
4. Public Regulation of Science: Clinical Trials at the Regional Cancer Centre
5. Loss of Trust in Experts: Earthquakes, Dams, and Well Collapses
6. Border Crossings: The Coloured Rain Controversy
7. The Backstage: Science News in the Making
8. Conclusion: Science, Media, and the Question of Democracy

Appendix
References
Index
About the Author

Shiju Sam Varughese

Shiju Sam Varughese

Shiju Sam Varughese

Description

Science communication, once the exclusive preserve of a scientific elite, has not been immune to the growing influence of mass media over society. As mass media becomes the most prominent site of public deliberation over science, multiple voices—both expert and non-expert—have begun to emerge, rewriting the social contract of science.
In the new millennium, the Indian state of Kerala saw a number of scientific controversies being discussed in the regional newspapers. Set against the backdrop of case studies of three major public controversies, Contested Knowledge explores how these mediated disputes brought the otherwise hidden dynamics of scientific knowledge production into full public view. It examines critical questions about ‘medialized science’, such as: What is a scientific-citizenry? How did a ‘scientific public sphere’ develop in Kerala? How does public contestation of knowledge contribute to deliberative democracy by re-instilling politics into science? Are there limits to such a democratization of science?
A fascinating commentary on the relation between science and society, this volume is a pioneering work that analyses the science–media–public interaction in a non-Western context.

About the Author

Shiju Sam Varughese
is Assistant Professor, Centre for Studies in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, School of Social Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, India. His research is in the field of Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Studies. He is particularly interested in media and science communication, public engagement with science and technology, social history of knowledge, cultural studies of science and technology, and regional modernities in South Asia. He has edited (with Satheese Chandra Bose) Kerala Modernity: Ideas, Spaces and Practices in Transition (2015).

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Table of contents


Foreword by Dhruv Raina
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations

1. Introduction
2. Science, Media, Risk Politics: Constructing a Scientific Public Sphere
3. Mediating Science: Scientific-Citizen Public and the Regional Press
4. Public Regulation of Science: Clinical Trials at the Regional Cancer Centre
5. Loss of Trust in Experts: Earthquakes, Dams, and Well Collapses
6. Border Crossings: The Coloured Rain Controversy
7. The Backstage: Science News in the Making
8. Conclusion: Science, Media, and the Question of Democracy

Appendix
References
Index
About the Author

Read More