Class and Conflict

Revisiting Pranab Bardhan’s Political Economy of India

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ISBN:

9780199499687

Publication date:

18/11/2019

Hardback

312 pages

216.0x140.0mm

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199499687

Publication date:

18/11/2019

Hardback

312 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Class and Conflict reflects on the enduring influence of Bardhan's original publication in the context of post-liberalization developments in India. The contributors to this volume engage with a wide range of issues, such as whether big business dominates India today, how subsidies retard economic growth, and how the middle classes are transforming politics. Together they try to answer the big question: what has really changed in the political and economic climate of the country over the last 30 years? It contributes to current debates on economic growth, crony capitalism, agrarian crisis, the politics of class and caste, and the role of the state in a liberalizing economy.

Rights:  World Rights

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Description

In 1984, Pranab Bardhan published his classic work The Political Economy of Development in India. It went on to become one of the most influential references on the political economy of development in the pre-reform period of independent India. Class and Conflict reflects on the enduring influence of Bardhan’s original publication in the context of post-liberalization developments in India. Drawing on their own world-leading research, the contributors to this volume engage with a wide range of issues, such as whether big business dominates India today, how subsidies retard economic growth, and how the middle classes are transforming politics. Together they try to answer the big question: what has really changed in the political and economic climate of the country over the last 30 years?

Exploring the continuities and changes that have characterized India’s political economy since 1984, this volume takes stock of the main challenges of India’s economic development today. It contributes to current debates on economic growth, crony capitalism, agrarian crisis, the politics of class and caste, and the role of the state in a liberalizing economy.

About the Editors

Elizabeth Chatterjee teaches regional and comparative politics at Queen Mary University of London.

Matthew McCartney teaches political economy and human development of South Asia at the University of Oxford.

Contributors

Asha Amirali

Pranab Bardhan

Leela Fernandes

Maitreesh Ghatak

John Hariss

Barbara Harriss-White

Muhammad Ali Jan

Rob Jenkins

James Manor

Ritwika Sen

Michael Walton

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Table of contents

List of Figures and Tables

Acknowledgements

 

I: Overview

  1. Revisiting The Political Economy of Development in India

                Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

  1. Reflections on Indian Political Economy

                Pranab Bardhan

 

II: The Indian Economy Three Decades On

  1. The Stagnation Debate: An Enduring Legacy

                Matthew McCartney

  1. Growth and the Subsidy Raj in India: Re-examining the Bardhan Hypothesis

                Maitreesh Ghatak and Ritwika Sen

  1. India’s Political Economy: Has Something Crucial Recently Changed?

                James Manor

 

III: The Dominant Proprietary Classes: Continuity and Change

  1. Business Interests and State Autonomy in India

                Rob Jenkins

  1. The Second Dominant Proprietary Class: Rich Farmers and the Political Economy of Indian Development

                John Harriss

  1. All Shook Up? State Professionals in the Reform Era

                Elizabeth Chatterjee

 

IV: New Elites

  1. Rethinking the ‘Dominant Proprietary Classes’: India’s Middle Classes and the Reproduction of Inequality

                Leela Fernandes

  1. Malgudi on the Move: Bardhan’s Political Economy and the Rest of India

                Barbara Harriss-White, Muhammad Ali Jan, and Asha Amirali

 

V: Conclusions

  1. An Indian Gilded Age? Continuity and Change in the Political Economy of India’s Development

                Michael Walton

 

Bibliography

Notes on Editors and Contributors

Index

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Features

  • The book is written by leading young and established scholars, many of them very well known in the field-not least Pranab Bardhan himself.
  • This volume provides a sweeping overview of what has changed in the second half of India's great seven-decade experiment with democracy.
  • It tackles some of the thorniest issues in Indian politics today, including the growing influence of big business and the middle classes, competition for state resources, the sustainability of economic growth, and why India continues to be plagued by bad roads and poor electricity supply.

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Edited by Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

Description

In 1984, Pranab Bardhan published his classic work The Political Economy of Development in India. It went on to become one of the most influential references on the political economy of development in the pre-reform period of independent India. Class and Conflict reflects on the enduring influence of Bardhan’s original publication in the context of post-liberalization developments in India. Drawing on their own world-leading research, the contributors to this volume engage with a wide range of issues, such as whether big business dominates India today, how subsidies retard economic growth, and how the middle classes are transforming politics. Together they try to answer the big question: what has really changed in the political and economic climate of the country over the last 30 years?

Exploring the continuities and changes that have characterized India’s political economy since 1984, this volume takes stock of the main challenges of India’s economic development today. It contributes to current debates on economic growth, crony capitalism, agrarian crisis, the politics of class and caste, and the role of the state in a liberalizing economy.

About the Editors

Elizabeth Chatterjee teaches regional and comparative politics at Queen Mary University of London.

Matthew McCartney teaches political economy and human development of South Asia at the University of Oxford.

Contributors

Asha Amirali

Pranab Bardhan

Leela Fernandes

Maitreesh Ghatak

John Hariss

Barbara Harriss-White

Muhammad Ali Jan

Rob Jenkins

James Manor

Ritwika Sen

Michael Walton

Read More

Table of contents

List of Figures and Tables

Acknowledgements

 

I: Overview

  1. Revisiting The Political Economy of Development in India

                Elizabeth Chatterjee and Matthew McCartney

  1. Reflections on Indian Political Economy

                Pranab Bardhan

 

II: The Indian Economy Three Decades On

  1. The Stagnation Debate: An Enduring Legacy

                Matthew McCartney

  1. Growth and the Subsidy Raj in India: Re-examining the Bardhan Hypothesis

                Maitreesh Ghatak and Ritwika Sen

  1. India’s Political Economy: Has Something Crucial Recently Changed?

                James Manor

 

III: The Dominant Proprietary Classes: Continuity and Change

  1. Business Interests and State Autonomy in India

                Rob Jenkins

  1. The Second Dominant Proprietary Class: Rich Farmers and the Political Economy of Indian Development

                John Harriss

  1. All Shook Up? State Professionals in the Reform Era

                Elizabeth Chatterjee

 

IV: New Elites

  1. Rethinking the ‘Dominant Proprietary Classes’: India’s Middle Classes and the Reproduction of Inequality

                Leela Fernandes

  1. Malgudi on the Move: Bardhan’s Political Economy and the Rest of India

                Barbara Harriss-White, Muhammad Ali Jan, and Asha Amirali

 

V: Conclusions

  1. An Indian Gilded Age? Continuity and Change in the Political Economy of India’s Development

                Michael Walton

 

Bibliography

Notes on Editors and Contributors

Index

Read More