Bangladeshi Migrants in India

Foreigners, Refugees, or Infiltrators?

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ISBN:

9780199476411

Publication date:

03/10/2017

Hardback

336 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199476411

Publication date:

03/10/2017

Hardback

336 pages

Rizwana Shamshad

This book focuses on the contemporary issue of undocumented Bangladeshi migration to the three Indian states of Assam, West Bengal, and Delhi, and how the migrants are perceived in light of the ongoing discourses on the various nationalisms in India.

Rights:  World Rights

Rizwana Shamshad

Description

In January 2011, Felani Khatun was shot dead while attempting to cross the border from India to Bangladesh. Her body remained hung on the fence as a warning to those who illegally crossed an international border. Migration to India from the current geographical and political entity called Bangladesh is more than a century old and had begun long before the nation states were created in South Asia. Often termed as ‘foreigners’ and ‘infiltrators’, Bangladeshi migrants such as Felani find their way into India for the promise of a better future. Post 1971, there has been a steady movement of people from Bangladesh into India, both as refugees and for economic need, making this migration a complex area of inquiry.
This book focuses on the contemporary issue of undocumented Bangladeshi migration to the three Indian states of Assam, West Bengal, and Delhi, and how the migrants are perceived in light of the ongoing discourses on the various nationalisms in India. Each state has a unique history and has taken different measures to respond to Bangladeshi migrants present in the state. Based on extensive fieldwork and insightful interviews with influential members from key political parties, civil society organizations, and Hindu and ethnic nationalist bodies in these states, the book explores the place and role of Bangladeshi migrants in relation to the inherent tension of Indian nationalism.

About the Author

Rizwana Shamshad
is a researcher at Victorian State Government department, Australia. She is also a research affiliate at the School of Culture, History and Language, the Australian National University.

Rizwana Shamshad

Table of contents


Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations

Introduction

1. Indian Nationalism: Narratives and Key Concepts
2. The Foreigners of Assam
3 The Refugees and the Migrants of West Bengal
4. The ‘Infiltrators’ of Delhi
5. The Parliamentary Debates on Bangladeshi Migrants (1971–2009)

Conclusion

Appendix 1: Benu’s Story: Interview with a Bangladeshi Migrant in Delhi
Appendix 2: Fieldwork Auto-ethnography in India
Appendix 3: The Actors: Interview Sources
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Rizwana Shamshad

Rizwana Shamshad

Review


‘Through the question of the Bangladeshi migrants, this book offers a remarkable analysis of two variants of nationalism, the secular and the ethno-religious ones, which are in competition in India today…. This is a most topical achievement for both, its pan-Indian approach and its regional focus.’
—Christophe Jaffrelot, Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology, King’s College London, UK

‘This finely crafted book focuses on the critical issue of how perceptions of foreigners affect the substance of nationalism. Rizwana Shamshad defines this issue with the insightful proposition that nationalism is a never-finished project, which remains permanently under construction and revision, as the rise of Hindutva and regionalism in India so clearly demonstrates.’
—David Ludden, Professor of History, New York University, USA

‘This is a deeply interesting and impressive study of Bangladeshi migration to India. Through her investigation of three regionally different case sites, Shamshad makes important contributions not only to the scholarship of Indian nationalism, but also the political discourse on Bangladeshi migrants in India.’

—Howard Brasted, Professor at School of Humanities, University of New England, Australia

Rizwana Shamshad

Description

In January 2011, Felani Khatun was shot dead while attempting to cross the border from India to Bangladesh. Her body remained hung on the fence as a warning to those who illegally crossed an international border. Migration to India from the current geographical and political entity called Bangladesh is more than a century old and had begun long before the nation states were created in South Asia. Often termed as ‘foreigners’ and ‘infiltrators’, Bangladeshi migrants such as Felani find their way into India for the promise of a better future. Post 1971, there has been a steady movement of people from Bangladesh into India, both as refugees and for economic need, making this migration a complex area of inquiry.
This book focuses on the contemporary issue of undocumented Bangladeshi migration to the three Indian states of Assam, West Bengal, and Delhi, and how the migrants are perceived in light of the ongoing discourses on the various nationalisms in India. Each state has a unique history and has taken different measures to respond to Bangladeshi migrants present in the state. Based on extensive fieldwork and insightful interviews with influential members from key political parties, civil society organizations, and Hindu and ethnic nationalist bodies in these states, the book explores the place and role of Bangladeshi migrants in relation to the inherent tension of Indian nationalism.

About the Author

Rizwana Shamshad
is a researcher at Victorian State Government department, Australia. She is also a research affiliate at the School of Culture, History and Language, the Australian National University.

Read More

Reviews


‘Through the question of the Bangladeshi migrants, this book offers a remarkable analysis of two variants of nationalism, the secular and the ethno-religious ones, which are in competition in India today…. This is a most topical achievement for both, its pan-Indian approach and its regional focus.’
—Christophe Jaffrelot, Professor of Indian Politics and Sociology, King’s College London, UK

‘This finely crafted book focuses on the critical issue of how perceptions of foreigners affect the substance of nationalism. Rizwana Shamshad defines this issue with the insightful proposition that nationalism is a never-finished project, which remains permanently under construction and revision, as the rise of Hindutva and regionalism in India so clearly demonstrates.’
—David Ludden, Professor of History, New York University, USA

‘This is a deeply interesting and impressive study of Bangladeshi migration to India. Through her investigation of three regionally different case sites, Shamshad makes important contributions not only to the scholarship of Indian nationalism, but also the political discourse on Bangladeshi migrants in India.’

—Howard Brasted, Professor at School of Humanities, University of New England, Australia

Read More

Table of contents


Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations

Introduction

1. Indian Nationalism: Narratives and Key Concepts
2. The Foreigners of Assam
3 The Refugees and the Migrants of West Bengal
4. The ‘Infiltrators’ of Delhi
5. The Parliamentary Debates on Bangladeshi Migrants (1971–2009)

Conclusion

Appendix 1: Benu’s Story: Interview with a Bangladeshi Migrant in Delhi
Appendix 2: Fieldwork Auto-ethnography in India
Appendix 3: The Actors: Interview Sources
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
About the Author

Read More