Atiya’s Journeys

A Muslim Woman From Colonial Bombay to Edwardian Britain

Price: 665.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780198068334

Publication date:

06/10/2010

Hardback

320 pages

Price: 665.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780198068334

Publication date:

06/10/2010

Hardback

320 pages

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Suitable for: With meticulous annotations, rare photographs, and extracts from Atiya’s other writings, this book will appeal scholars and students interested in travel narratives, gender studies, Urdu literature, Islam as well as modern history of India and Britain.

Rights:  World Rights

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Description

Born in Istanbul and raised in colonial Bombay, Atiya Fyzee (1877—1967), of the renowned Tyabji clan, was an extraordinary woman of her time. Traveller, writer, and reformer, she was a cultural icon–not least on account of her friendships with two of South Asia's prominent Muslim intellectuals, Maulana Shibli Numani and Muhammed Iqbal. Her partnership with her husband, artist, and writer, Samuel Rahamin also earned the couple international acclaim in the fields of music, dance, visual arts, theatre and literature. Atiya's Journeys is the first English translation of Atiya Fyzee's travelogue-cum-diary, Zamana-i-tahsil, published in an Urdu journal in 1906—7. A fascinating account of a Muslim woman's experience of Edwardian Britain, this unique narrative moves away from formulaic European travelogues by Indian men in placing its emphasis on the ‘everyday'. From her visits to the opera to her experience of the lives of prominent Indians, from her accounts of daily activities of women and subaltern classes to her advice to her readers in India, Atiya's travels and writings reveal a kaleidoscope of the multicultural ethos of Edwardian Britain.

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Siobhan Lambert-hurley

Description

Born in Istanbul and raised in colonial Bombay, Atiya Fyzee (1877—1967), of the renowned Tyabji clan, was an extraordinary woman of her time. Traveller, writer, and reformer, she was a cultural icon–not least on account of her friendships with two of South Asia's prominent Muslim intellectuals, Maulana Shibli Numani and Muhammed Iqbal. Her partnership with her husband, artist, and writer, Samuel Rahamin also earned the couple international acclaim in the fields of music, dance, visual arts, theatre and literature. Atiya's Journeys is the first English translation of Atiya Fyzee's travelogue-cum-diary, Zamana-i-tahsil, published in an Urdu journal in 1906—7. A fascinating account of a Muslim woman's experience of Edwardian Britain, this unique narrative moves away from formulaic European travelogues by Indian men in placing its emphasis on the ‘everyday'. From her visits to the opera to her experience of the lives of prominent Indians, from her accounts of daily activities of women and subaltern classes to her advice to her readers in India, Atiya's travels and writings reveal a kaleidoscope of the multicultural ethos of Edwardian Britain.

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