Visual Histories

Photography in the Popular Imagination

Price: 850.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780198090267

Publication date:

15/03/2013

Paperback

196 pages

241.0x159.0mm

Price: 850.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780198090267

Publication date:

15/03/2013

Paperback

196 pages

241.0x159.0mm

Malavika Karlekar

Suitable for:  Anybody keen on learning more about the history of photography in India as well as students and teachers of photography, history, and sociology

Rights:  World Rights

Malavika Karlekar

Description

Not much is known about how the coming of photography changed visual discourse or affected people’s lives. This volume documents such a history through photographs and the history of photographs in India. Divided into two sections, the thirty-two essays, illustrated with archival photographs, look at the camera in the colonial era and in post- Independence India. The fi rst section looks at photography through ‘The Colonial Eye’— with the camera and the studio becoming necessary prostheses in the new engagement between the colonized and the rulers in the nineteenth century. Europeans—of whom the British were the largest in number—were the initial users of the photographic studio and early studio images of the sahib—civil servant, lawyer, tea planter, missionary, and so on—are among the fi rst available visuals. Soon, the memsahib appeared at the sahib’s side with or without selfconscious offspring. From around the end of the 1850s, as the Indian urban middle class started patronizing photographic studios, these became instrumental in fracturing notions of space and visibility: where the use of public space was governed by the discriminatory practices of race and gender, the photographic studio became a shared locale. ‘Imaging India’, the second section of the volume, looks at some such moments as well as takes the viewer to Independence and the years beyond.

Malavika Karlekar

Malavika Karlekar

Malavika Karlekar

Malavika Karlekar

Description

Not much is known about how the coming of photography changed visual discourse or affected people’s lives. This volume documents such a history through photographs and the history of photographs in India. Divided into two sections, the thirty-two essays, illustrated with archival photographs, look at the camera in the colonial era and in post- Independence India. The fi rst section looks at photography through ‘The Colonial Eye’— with the camera and the studio becoming necessary prostheses in the new engagement between the colonized and the rulers in the nineteenth century. Europeans—of whom the British were the largest in number—were the initial users of the photographic studio and early studio images of the sahib—civil servant, lawyer, tea planter, missionary, and so on—are among the fi rst available visuals. Soon, the memsahib appeared at the sahib’s side with or without selfconscious offspring. From around the end of the 1850s, as the Indian urban middle class started patronizing photographic studios, these became instrumental in fracturing notions of space and visibility: where the use of public space was governed by the discriminatory practices of race and gender, the photographic studio became a shared locale. ‘Imaging India’, the second section of the volume, looks at some such moments as well as takes the viewer to Independence and the years beyond.

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