The Gendered Proletariat

Sex Work, Workers’ Movement, and Agency

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ISBN:

9780199477753

Publication date:

25/09/2017

Hardback

264 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199477753

Publication date:

25/09/2017

Hardback

264 pages

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Through a political–economic analysis of prostitution, this book examines whether sex work is generative of value, and renders problematic the dimension of ‘work’ in sex work.

Rights:  World Rights

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Description

A sex worker, as we know her today, is defined by her work. She is socially useful reproductive labour: a gendered proletariat.
Through a political–economic analysis of prostitution, this book examines whether sex work is generative of value, and renders problematic the dimension of ‘work’ in sex work. It traces the history of sex work through the colonial and postcolonial period, and the transformation of the role of the state from a penal to a watch-care model of surveillance in the wake of the AIDS scourge.
With sex workers’ movement in Sonagachi, Kolkata, defining the context, the book deploys Marxian categories of use value and exchange value and the dual in concrete labour and abstract labour to explore the case. It presents a critical observation on agency that the sex workers’ movement claims to have obtained. Delving into the case, the book provides a close reading of sex workers’ manifesto to reveal the fault lines that make incorporation of the prostitute in worker–citizen complex always incomplete.

About the Editor

Swati Ghosh
is associate professor of economics and director of Women’s Studies Centre at the Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata. She has contributed to books on issues of gender, labour, and development. Her publications include articles in Social Text, Economic and Political Weekly, Hecate, Identity Culture and Politics.

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Table of contents


List of Abbreviations
Credits
Preface and Acknowledgements
Rethinking the Prostitute Question
Part I: Sex Work and Value
1. Economics and Sex Work
2. Sex Work as a Form of Service
3. Sex Work and Theory of Value
4. Feminist Engagements with Value
5. Sex Work as Affective Labour
Part II: From Prostitute to Sex Worker: An Incomplete Revolution
6. Genealogy of the Prostitute: Colony to Postcolony
7. State, Welfare, and Governmentality
8. The Shadow Lines of Citizenship
9. Why (In)complete Revolution
Part III: On the Question of Agency
10. A Manifesto and the (Im)possibilities of Agency
11. Transgressing (B)orders: Prostitute as Mother and Wife
The Prostitute: A Gendered Proletariat
References
Index
About the Author

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Edited by Swati Ghosh

Description

A sex worker, as we know her today, is defined by her work. She is socially useful reproductive labour: a gendered proletariat.
Through a political–economic analysis of prostitution, this book examines whether sex work is generative of value, and renders problematic the dimension of ‘work’ in sex work. It traces the history of sex work through the colonial and postcolonial period, and the transformation of the role of the state from a penal to a watch-care model of surveillance in the wake of the AIDS scourge.
With sex workers’ movement in Sonagachi, Kolkata, defining the context, the book deploys Marxian categories of use value and exchange value and the dual in concrete labour and abstract labour to explore the case. It presents a critical observation on agency that the sex workers’ movement claims to have obtained. Delving into the case, the book provides a close reading of sex workers’ manifesto to reveal the fault lines that make incorporation of the prostitute in worker–citizen complex always incomplete.

About the Editor

Swati Ghosh
is associate professor of economics and director of Women’s Studies Centre at the Rabindra Bharati University, Kolkata. She has contributed to books on issues of gender, labour, and development. Her publications include articles in Social Text, Economic and Political Weekly, Hecate, Identity Culture and Politics.

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Table of contents


List of Abbreviations
Credits
Preface and Acknowledgements
Rethinking the Prostitute Question
Part I: Sex Work and Value
1. Economics and Sex Work
2. Sex Work as a Form of Service
3. Sex Work and Theory of Value
4. Feminist Engagements with Value
5. Sex Work as Affective Labour
Part II: From Prostitute to Sex Worker: An Incomplete Revolution
6. Genealogy of the Prostitute: Colony to Postcolony
7. State, Welfare, and Governmentality
8. The Shadow Lines of Citizenship
9. Why (In)complete Revolution
Part III: On the Question of Agency
10. A Manifesto and the (Im)possibilities of Agency
11. Transgressing (B)orders: Prostitute as Mother and Wife
The Prostitute: A Gendered Proletariat
References
Index
About the Author

Read More