The Arthur Crawford Scandal

Corruption, Governance, and Indian Victims

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ISBN:

9780199498611

Publication date:

06/12/2019

Hardback

264 pages

216.0x140.0mm

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199498611

Publication date:

06/12/2019

Hardback

264 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Michael D. Metelits

A corruption scandal in 19th century India led to efforts to intimidate Indian witnesses against the accused British official, Arthur Travers Crawford. Litigation in India fueled a political pressure campaign in London producing questions in the House of Commons. Negotiations between London, Bombay, and Calcutta led to a compromise that saw Indians fired from government servants, and while Arthur Travers Crawford stood accused of corruption, he was subsequently absolved of all allegations of bribery.

Rights:  World Rights

Michael D. Metelits

Description

Set against the political background of 19th century colonial India, The Arthur Crawford Scandal presents a critical analysis of bureaucratic and legal corruption in the country and suggests some long-term implications for the Indian justice system. The scandal was exposed when the eponymous revenue commissioner of the Central Division of Bombay Presidency, Arthur Travers Crawford, stood accused of corruption, but was subsequently absolved of all allegations of bribery.

Through a descriptive analysis of this event, the volume also focusses on the collateral damage of the scandal—the Indian victims—as well as issues of racism, cultural differences and class conflict. Written in an engaging manner, the volume draws one into the narrative of the empire and reveals how public discussions in the newspapers, court rooms, and the British parliament played a role in shaping public notions of administrative morality. The book shows that even a century ago, discriminatory treatment by officials involved in corrupt acts weakened public confidence in and support for the ruling government.

About the Author

Michael D. Metelits is a retired United States Ambassador as well as a historian and an independent research scholar. Prior to a career in the United States Foreign Service, he was a lecturer of history at California State College, San Francisco. He graduated from Northwestern University, Illinois, completed his post-graduation and received an MS and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and later received an MS degree from the National War College, Washington, D.C. He now resides in Ocala, Florida.

Michael D. Metelits

Table of contents

List of Abbreviations

Preface

  1. Background to a Scandal: The Milieu
  2. Spreading the Net
  3. Thrown to the Wolves? The Case of Empress v Hanmantrao
  4. The Stigma That Would Not Go Away
  5. The Mamlatdar Issue Exported
  6. The Crawford Commission
  7. Bombay Government Opinions about the Report: Speaking to Deaf Ears
  8. Mamlatdar Ping Pong
  9. Confessions and Aftermath
  10. Conclusions

Appendix

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Michael D. Metelits

Features

  • The Crawford scandal is well known in India, less so elsewhere. This book goes behind the scenes in portraying how Indian colonial bureaucracy and legal systems promoted differing views of "justice".
  • The book addresses shortcomings in the legal system in late 19th century India.
  • The book also details how a political pressure campaign in London led to a decision that solved problems in London, rather than in Bombay.

Michael D. Metelits

Michael D. Metelits

Description

Set against the political background of 19th century colonial India, The Arthur Crawford Scandal presents a critical analysis of bureaucratic and legal corruption in the country and suggests some long-term implications for the Indian justice system. The scandal was exposed when the eponymous revenue commissioner of the Central Division of Bombay Presidency, Arthur Travers Crawford, stood accused of corruption, but was subsequently absolved of all allegations of bribery.

Through a descriptive analysis of this event, the volume also focusses on the collateral damage of the scandal—the Indian victims—as well as issues of racism, cultural differences and class conflict. Written in an engaging manner, the volume draws one into the narrative of the empire and reveals how public discussions in the newspapers, court rooms, and the British parliament played a role in shaping public notions of administrative morality. The book shows that even a century ago, discriminatory treatment by officials involved in corrupt acts weakened public confidence in and support for the ruling government.

About the Author

Michael D. Metelits is a retired United States Ambassador as well as a historian and an independent research scholar. Prior to a career in the United States Foreign Service, he was a lecturer of history at California State College, San Francisco. He graduated from Northwestern University, Illinois, completed his post-graduation and received an MS and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and later received an MS degree from the National War College, Washington, D.C. He now resides in Ocala, Florida.

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Table of contents

List of Abbreviations

Preface

  1. Background to a Scandal: The Milieu
  2. Spreading the Net
  3. Thrown to the Wolves? The Case of Empress v Hanmantrao
  4. The Stigma That Would Not Go Away
  5. The Mamlatdar Issue Exported
  6. The Crawford Commission
  7. Bombay Government Opinions about the Report: Speaking to Deaf Ears
  8. Mamlatdar Ping Pong
  9. Confessions and Aftermath
  10. Conclusions

Appendix

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Read More