Reconsidering American Power

Pax Americana and the Social Sciences

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ISBN:

9780199490585

Publication date:

10/01/2020

Hardback

572 pages

216.0x140.0mm

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199490585

Publication date:

10/01/2020

Hardback

572 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Reconsidering American Power offers trenchant studies by renowned scholars who reassess the role of the social sciences in the construction and upkeep of the Pax Americana and the influence of Pax Americana on the social sciences. With the thematic image for this enterprise as the ‘fiery hunt’ for Ahab’s whale, the contributors pursue realities behind the theories, and reconsider the real origins and motives of their fields with an eye on what will deter or repurpose the ‘fiery hunts’ to come, by offering a critical insider’s view.

Rights:  World Rights

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Description

Postcolonial studies, postmodern studies, even posthuman studies emerge, and intellectuals demand that social sciences be remade to address fundamentals of the human condition, from human rights to global environmental crises. Since these fields owe so much to American state sponsorship, is it easier to reimagine the human and the modern than to properly measure the pervasive American influence?

Reconsidering American Power offers trenchant studies by renowned scholars who reassess the role of the social sciences in the construction and upkeep of the Pax Americana and the influence of Pax Americana on the social sciences. With the thematic image for this enterprise as the ‘fiery hunt’ for Ahab’s whale, the contributors pursue realities behind the theories, and reconsider the real origins and motives of their fields with an eye on what will deter or repurpose the ‘fiery hunts’ to come, by offering a critical insider’s view.

About the Editors

John D. Kelly is Christian W. MacKaeuer Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago, USA.

Kurt Jacobsen is an associate (formerly research associate and lecturer) in political science at the University of Chicago, USA.

Marston H. Morgan is a member of the United States Foreign Service, USA.

Contributors

Tani Barlow, Michael K. Bourdaghs, Bruce Cumings, Edward Fullbrook, Anne I. Harrington, Michael Hudson, Kurt Jacobsen, John D. Kelly, Matthew A. Light, Marston H. Morgan, Susanne Hoeber Rudolph, Lloyd I. Rudolph, Marshall Sahlins, James C. Scott, George Steinmetz, and Robert Vitalis

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Table of contents

Introduction

‘Call me Ishmael’: American Epic, American Grotesque, American Sublime, and the American Social Sciences

John D. Kelly, Kurt Jacobsen, and Marston H. Morgan

 

Part One

Origins: The American Century and Its New Sciences, in War and Peace, at Home and Abroad

  1. The Noble American Science of Imperial Relations and Its Laws of Race Development

Robert Vitalis

  1. American Power and the New Mandarins Redux: Hegemony, Orthodoxy, and International Relations

Kurt Jacobsen

 

  1. Seeing Like an Area Specialist
    Bruce Cumings

               

  1. The Imperialism of Categories: Situating Knowledge in a Globalizing World

Susanne Hoeber Rudolph

               

 

Part Two

Anomalies: The Use and Abuse of Political Economy 

  1. The Misuse of Numbers: Audits, Quantification, and the Obfuscation of Politics

James C. Scott with Matthew A. Light

               

  1. The Use and Abuse of Mathematical Economics

Michael Hudson

 

  1. How to Bring Economics into the 3rd Millennium

Edward Fullbrook

 

 

Part Three

Predicaments: Some Consequences of Applied Social Science

  1. Power after Nuclear Weapons

Anne I. Harrington

 

  1. American Sociology and Colonialism, 1890s–1960s

George Steinmetz

 

  1. Translating Social Science for China: Qu Qiubai and History’s Coffin

Tani Barlow

               

  1. The Golden Bough at Breton Woods: Anticipating the Decline and Fall of American Anthropology

Marston H. Morgan

  1. Beyond National Liberalism: Self-Determination and the World of Pax Americana

John D. Kelly

               

 

Part Four

Expeditions: After Reality Capsizes Theory

 

  1. South Asia and American Power

Lloyd I. Rudolph

                 

  1. The Ghosts of Anticommunism and Neoliberalism: East Asian Studies in the Twenty-first Century

Michael K. Bourdaghs

 

  1. Counterfeit COIN, and the State of Nature Effect

Marshall Sahlins

 

Conclusion

  1. Starbuck's Dilemma and Academic Expertise

John D. Kelly and Kurt Jacobsen

 

Index

About the Editors and Contributors

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Review

A compelling collection of critical essays that sheds important new light on the nexus between the growth and expansion of the American social sciences and the rise of American power.

Sanjib Baruah, Professor of Political Studies, Bard College, New York

This volume assembles astute essays from scholars across a wide range of social science disciplines. The result is a provocative collection whose profound critique of the development of the social sciences in the shadow of American power offers penetrating insights and hope for renewal.

John Echeverri-Gent, Department of Politics, University of Virginia.

Edited by John D. Kelly & Kurt Jacobsen and Marston H. Morgan

Description

Postcolonial studies, postmodern studies, even posthuman studies emerge, and intellectuals demand that social sciences be remade to address fundamentals of the human condition, from human rights to global environmental crises. Since these fields owe so much to American state sponsorship, is it easier to reimagine the human and the modern than to properly measure the pervasive American influence?

Reconsidering American Power offers trenchant studies by renowned scholars who reassess the role of the social sciences in the construction and upkeep of the Pax Americana and the influence of Pax Americana on the social sciences. With the thematic image for this enterprise as the ‘fiery hunt’ for Ahab’s whale, the contributors pursue realities behind the theories, and reconsider the real origins and motives of their fields with an eye on what will deter or repurpose the ‘fiery hunts’ to come, by offering a critical insider’s view.

About the Editors

John D. Kelly is Christian W. MacKaeuer Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago, USA.

Kurt Jacobsen is an associate (formerly research associate and lecturer) in political science at the University of Chicago, USA.

Marston H. Morgan is a member of the United States Foreign Service, USA.

Contributors

Tani Barlow, Michael K. Bourdaghs, Bruce Cumings, Edward Fullbrook, Anne I. Harrington, Michael Hudson, Kurt Jacobsen, John D. Kelly, Matthew A. Light, Marston H. Morgan, Susanne Hoeber Rudolph, Lloyd I. Rudolph, Marshall Sahlins, James C. Scott, George Steinmetz, and Robert Vitalis

Read More

Reviews

A compelling collection of critical essays that sheds important new light on the nexus between the growth and expansion of the American social sciences and the rise of American power.

Sanjib Baruah, Professor of Political Studies, Bard College, New York

This volume assembles astute essays from scholars across a wide range of social science disciplines. The result is a provocative collection whose profound critique of the development of the social sciences in the shadow of American power offers penetrating insights and hope for renewal.

John Echeverri-Gent, Department of Politics, University of Virginia.

Read More

Table of contents

Introduction

‘Call me Ishmael’: American Epic, American Grotesque, American Sublime, and the American Social Sciences

John D. Kelly, Kurt Jacobsen, and Marston H. Morgan

 

Part One

Origins: The American Century and Its New Sciences, in War and Peace, at Home and Abroad

  1. The Noble American Science of Imperial Relations and Its Laws of Race Development

Robert Vitalis

  1. American Power and the New Mandarins Redux: Hegemony, Orthodoxy, and International Relations

Kurt Jacobsen

 

  1. Seeing Like an Area Specialist
    Bruce Cumings

               

  1. The Imperialism of Categories: Situating Knowledge in a Globalizing World

Susanne Hoeber Rudolph

               

 

Part Two

Anomalies: The Use and Abuse of Political Economy 

  1. The Misuse of Numbers: Audits, Quantification, and the Obfuscation of Politics

James C. Scott with Matthew A. Light

               

  1. The Use and Abuse of Mathematical Economics

Michael Hudson

 

  1. How to Bring Economics into the 3rd Millennium

Edward Fullbrook

 

 

Part Three

Predicaments: Some Consequences of Applied Social Science

  1. Power after Nuclear Weapons

Anne I. Harrington

 

  1. American Sociology and Colonialism, 1890s–1960s

George Steinmetz

 

  1. Translating Social Science for China: Qu Qiubai and History’s Coffin

Tani Barlow

               

  1. The Golden Bough at Breton Woods: Anticipating the Decline and Fall of American Anthropology

Marston H. Morgan

  1. Beyond National Liberalism: Self-Determination and the World of Pax Americana

John D. Kelly

               

 

Part Four

Expeditions: After Reality Capsizes Theory

 

  1. South Asia and American Power

Lloyd I. Rudolph

                 

  1. The Ghosts of Anticommunism and Neoliberalism: East Asian Studies in the Twenty-first Century

Michael K. Bourdaghs

 

  1. Counterfeit COIN, and the State of Nature Effect

Marshall Sahlins

 

Conclusion

  1. Starbuck's Dilemma and Academic Expertise

John D. Kelly and Kurt Jacobsen

 

Index

About the Editors and Contributors

Read More