Quarter Century of Liberalisation in India

Essays from Economic & Political Weekly

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ISBN:

9780199481071

Publication date:

18/01/2018

Hardback

252 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199481071

Publication date:

18/01/2018

Hardback

252 pages

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Liberalisation officially began in 1991, but the seed for it was sown in the late 1950s by proponents of free markets. The debates over the opening up of the domestic market continued through the 1960s in India, resulting in fitful bursts of reforms. It was only from the mid-1980s that talk of liberalisation gathered steam, culminating in the decision to relax economic norms in 1991. These last twenty-five years since liberalisation have seen animated arguments being exchanged. The collection of essays in this volume captures different ideological positions on the subject and offers an informed, 360-degree analysis on economic liberalisation.

Rights:  World Rights

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Description

Liberalisation officially began in 1991, but the seed for it was sown in the late 1950s by proponents of free markets. The debates over the opening up of the domestic market continued through the 1960s in India, resulting in fitful bursts of reforms. It was only from the mid-1980s that talk of liberalisation gathered steam, culminating in the decision to relax economic norms in 1991.
Though the decision to scrap industrial licences and ease the restrictions on FDI and imports signalled absolute belief in the virtues of competition, the last twenty-five years have seen animated arguments being exchanged. The pages of Economic & Political Weekly have been faithful witnesses to the finest minds and the boldest thinkers whose opinions, insights, and comments spanned these decades. The collection of essays in this volume captures different ideological positions and offers an informed, 360-degree analysis on economic liberalisation.

Contributors:
1. Montek S. Ahluwalia
2. Deepak Nayyar
3. Prabhat Patnaik
4. Anjan Chakrabarti
5. T. Sabri Öncü
6. Atul Sood
7. Rajiv Kumar
8. Pulapre Balakrishnan
9. Chirashree Das Gupta
10. Surajit Mazumdar
11. R. Nagaraj
12. Shantanu De Roy
13. A.V. Rajwade
14. Aseem Shrivastava

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Table of contents


Preface

I. The Case of 1991
The 1991 Reforms: How Home-grown Were They?
Montek S. Ahluwalia

Economic Liberalisation in India: Then and Now
Deepak Nayyar

II. Transition and Reforms
Economic Liberalisation and the Working Poor
Prabhat Patnaik

Indian Economy in Transition: The New Order of Things
Anjan Chakrabarti

TINA, India and Economic Liberalisation
T. Sabri Öncü

Politics of Growth: Script and Postscript
Atul Sood

Making Reforms Work for the Common People
Rajiv Kumar

III. Reforms, State Intervention and the Market
Markets, Growth and Social Opportunity: India since 1991
Pulapre Balakrishnan

‘Fiscal Federalism’ in India since 1991: Infirmities of Sound Finance Paradigm
Chirashree Das Gupta, Surajit Mazumdar

Economic Reforms and Manufacturing Sector Growth: Need for Reconfiguring the Industrialisation Model
R. Nagaraj

Economic Reforms and Agricultural Growth in India
Shantanu De Roy

No Room for Complacency: Can We Afford Build-up of External Liabilities
A.V. Rajwade

A-Meri-India: A Note from the Land of Frustrated Aspirants
Aseem Shrivastava

About the Contributors

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Features

  • Examines the 1990–91 economic reforms from diverse ideological perspectives
  • Dissects the role of the state over the last 25 years in addressing poverty, nutrition, and income inequality
  • Examines the economic and social outcomes of the non-interventionist state, post liberalisation
  • Explains why there is still widespread dissatisfaction with the progress and outcome of economic reforms

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Contributors: 1. Montek S. Ahluwalia 2. Deepak Nayyar 3. Prabhat Patnaik 4. Anjan Chakrabarti 5. T. Sabri Öncü 6. Atul Sood 7. Rajiv Kumar 8. Pulapre Balakrishnan 9. Chirashree Das Gupta 10. Surajit Mazumdar 11. R. Nagaraj 12. Shantanu De Roy 13. A.V. Rajwade 14. Aseem Shrivastava

Description

Liberalisation officially began in 1991, but the seed for it was sown in the late 1950s by proponents of free markets. The debates over the opening up of the domestic market continued through the 1960s in India, resulting in fitful bursts of reforms. It was only from the mid-1980s that talk of liberalisation gathered steam, culminating in the decision to relax economic norms in 1991.
Though the decision to scrap industrial licences and ease the restrictions on FDI and imports signalled absolute belief in the virtues of competition, the last twenty-five years have seen animated arguments being exchanged. The pages of Economic & Political Weekly have been faithful witnesses to the finest minds and the boldest thinkers whose opinions, insights, and comments spanned these decades. The collection of essays in this volume captures different ideological positions and offers an informed, 360-degree analysis on economic liberalisation.

Contributors:
1. Montek S. Ahluwalia
2. Deepak Nayyar
3. Prabhat Patnaik
4. Anjan Chakrabarti
5. T. Sabri Öncü
6. Atul Sood
7. Rajiv Kumar
8. Pulapre Balakrishnan
9. Chirashree Das Gupta
10. Surajit Mazumdar
11. R. Nagaraj
12. Shantanu De Roy
13. A.V. Rajwade
14. Aseem Shrivastava

Read More

Table of contents


Preface

I. The Case of 1991
The 1991 Reforms: How Home-grown Were They?
Montek S. Ahluwalia

Economic Liberalisation in India: Then and Now
Deepak Nayyar

II. Transition and Reforms
Economic Liberalisation and the Working Poor
Prabhat Patnaik

Indian Economy in Transition: The New Order of Things
Anjan Chakrabarti

TINA, India and Economic Liberalisation
T. Sabri Öncü

Politics of Growth: Script and Postscript
Atul Sood

Making Reforms Work for the Common People
Rajiv Kumar

III. Reforms, State Intervention and the Market
Markets, Growth and Social Opportunity: India since 1991
Pulapre Balakrishnan

‘Fiscal Federalism’ in India since 1991: Infirmities of Sound Finance Paradigm
Chirashree Das Gupta, Surajit Mazumdar

Economic Reforms and Manufacturing Sector Growth: Need for Reconfiguring the Industrialisation Model
R. Nagaraj

Economic Reforms and Agricultural Growth in India
Shantanu De Roy

No Room for Complacency: Can We Afford Build-up of External Liabilities
A.V. Rajwade

A-Meri-India: A Note from the Land of Frustrated Aspirants
Aseem Shrivastava

About the Contributors

Read More