Poetry of Belonging

Muslim Imaginings of India 1850–1950

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ISBN:

9780190121013

Publication date:

05/02/2020

Hardback

344 pages

216.0x140.0mm

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780190121013

Publication date:

05/02/2020

Hardback

344 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

This book engages with the question of Muslim rootedness in India. It uses various Muslim 'voices' in north India to explore imaginings of the local, regional, and transnational at a time when the Indian nation state did not exist. Using poetry as an archive and the site of its performance, the musha'irah, as a way of understanding public spaces, the book charts changing understandings of what it meant to be Muslim and Indian. Perhaps this will offer a new way of thinking about these relationships, especially at a time when Muslim loyalty to India has yet again emerged as a politically polarising question.

Rights:  World Rights

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

Description

Poetry of Belonging is an exploration of north-Indian Muslim identity through poetry at a time when the Indian nation state did not exist. Between 1850 and 1950, when precolonial forms of cultural traditions, such as the musha’irah, were undergoing massive transformations to remain relevant, certain Muslim ‘voices’ configured, negotiated, and articulated their imaginings of what it meant to be Muslim.

Using poetry as an archive, the book traces the history of the musha’irah, the site of poetic performance, as a way of understanding public spaces through the changing economic, social, political, and technological contexts of the time. It seeks to locate the changing ideas of watan (homeland) and hubb-e watanī (patriotism) in order to offer new perspectives on how Muslim intellectuals, poets, political leaders, and journalists conceived of and expressed their relationship to India and to the transnational Muslim community.

The volume aims to spark a renegotiation of identity and belonging, especially at a time when Muslim loyalty to India has yet again emerged as a politically polarizing question.

About the Author

Ali Khan Mahmudabad is an academic, columnist, and public speaker. He has a specialization in a wide range of subjects involving political, religious, and security-related issues in South Asia as well as the greater part of West Asia (the Middle East). He is currently assistant professor of history and political science at Ashoka University, Sonipat. He writes a fortnightly column for the Urdu daily The Inquilab, apart from also regularly contributing to English and Hindi print and online publications.

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

Table of contents

List of Images

Note on Style and Transliteration

List of Abbreviations

Acknowledegments

Introduction

  1. The Mushā‘irah in the Nineteenth Century
  2. Poetry, Politics, and Provinces
  3. Lineages, Loudspeakers, and Labourers
  4. Ideas of the Homeland
  5. Nodes of Identity: The Transnational and the Regional
  6. The Crossroads of Qaum, Millat, and Watan

Conclusion

Select Glossary

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

Ali Khan Mahmudabad

Description

Poetry of Belonging is an exploration of north-Indian Muslim identity through poetry at a time when the Indian nation state did not exist. Between 1850 and 1950, when precolonial forms of cultural traditions, such as the musha’irah, were undergoing massive transformations to remain relevant, certain Muslim ‘voices’ configured, negotiated, and articulated their imaginings of what it meant to be Muslim.

Using poetry as an archive, the book traces the history of the musha’irah, the site of poetic performance, as a way of understanding public spaces through the changing economic, social, political, and technological contexts of the time. It seeks to locate the changing ideas of watan (homeland) and hubb-e watanī (patriotism) in order to offer new perspectives on how Muslim intellectuals, poets, political leaders, and journalists conceived of and expressed their relationship to India and to the transnational Muslim community.

The volume aims to spark a renegotiation of identity and belonging, especially at a time when Muslim loyalty to India has yet again emerged as a politically polarizing question.

About the Author

Ali Khan Mahmudabad is an academic, columnist, and public speaker. He has a specialization in a wide range of subjects involving political, religious, and security-related issues in South Asia as well as the greater part of West Asia (the Middle East). He is currently assistant professor of history and political science at Ashoka University, Sonipat. He writes a fortnightly column for the Urdu daily The Inquilab, apart from also regularly contributing to English and Hindi print and online publications.

Read More

Table of contents

List of Images

Note on Style and Transliteration

List of Abbreviations

Acknowledegments

Introduction

  1. The Mushā‘irah in the Nineteenth Century
  2. Poetry, Politics, and Provinces
  3. Lineages, Loudspeakers, and Labourers
  4. Ideas of the Homeland
  5. Nodes of Identity: The Transnational and the Regional
  6. The Crossroads of Qaum, Millat, and Watan

Conclusion

Select Glossary

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Read More