Performing Nationhood

The Emotional Roots of Swadeshi Nationhood in Bengal, 1905–12

Price: 1295.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199480180

Publication date:

06/07/2019

Hardback

212 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Price: 1295.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199480180

Publication date:

06/07/2019

Hardback

212 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Mimasha Pandit

This book serves as the corridor to one’s ‘self’. Begun as a humble attempt to trace the performance history of Bengal it has passed through various planes of interrogation, and interpretation, until the notion of nation gained a new life in the performative space. This book has tried to trace the winding path of the emergent emotion of nationhood as it developed as a nuanced image of ‘self’, thereby locating the beginning of that emotion of national ‘self’.

Rights:  World Rights

Mimasha Pandit

Description

This book serves as the corridor to one’s ‘self’. It began as a humble attempt to interrogate the performance history of Swadeshi Bengal. The burgeoning public space and audibility of voices hitherto unheard presented a two-way problem, for the colonisers, as well as for the colonised. The thinking mind that hid behind a facade of obedience suddenly appeared before all. The transparent veil separating the hidden from the manifest was torn apart. In the context of swadeshi and boycott agitation, performative spaces like theatre, jatra, and songs did not just serve as a forum for disseminating the notions of nationhood put forward by the intellectuals. The ideas gained a life of their own once they were placed in the performative space. Encompassing both the performer and the audience/recipient of the ideas, the notion underwent a change at various planes of consciousness. The notion of nation, as disseminated by the performances, acquired a different meaning at the level of enactment, and attained an entirely new substance when received by the audience. None of these exchanges occurred in complete passivity of any one party present in the performative space. Consequently, the emergent emotion of nationhood developed as a nuanced image of ‘self’. This book has tried to locate the beginning of that emotion of national ‘self’.

About the Author

Mimasha Pandit, Assistant Professor in the History Department of Mankar College, Mankar, Burdwan.  She was awarded PhD degree from the University of Calcutta. Her area of research was the performance/emotional history of early twentieth century Bengal. She worked upon the popular performative media of Bengal (theatre, jatra and songs) to locate the emotional bond/nationhood engendered among the Bengali public.

Mimasha Pandit

Table of contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction: In Search of An Emotional History of Swadeshi Bengal

  1. Inventing Indigeneity: A Storehouse of Collective Memory
  2. Community of Emotion: In Search of a Swadeshi Public
  3. Community of Felt Emotions: Birth of an Imagined National ‘Self’
  4. Violence and Nationhood: Unearthing the Hidden Transcript of Resistance
  5. Oppressed ‘Self/Selves’: Emotional Roots of Nationalism

 

Epilogue

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Mimasha Pandit

Features

  • The book dealing with the performance history of Bengal theorizes the engendering of nationhood in all its performative aspects.

Mimasha Pandit

Mimasha Pandit

Description

This book serves as the corridor to one’s ‘self’. It began as a humble attempt to interrogate the performance history of Swadeshi Bengal. The burgeoning public space and audibility of voices hitherto unheard presented a two-way problem, for the colonisers, as well as for the colonised. The thinking mind that hid behind a facade of obedience suddenly appeared before all. The transparent veil separating the hidden from the manifest was torn apart. In the context of swadeshi and boycott agitation, performative spaces like theatre, jatra, and songs did not just serve as a forum for disseminating the notions of nationhood put forward by the intellectuals. The ideas gained a life of their own once they were placed in the performative space. Encompassing both the performer and the audience/recipient of the ideas, the notion underwent a change at various planes of consciousness. The notion of nation, as disseminated by the performances, acquired a different meaning at the level of enactment, and attained an entirely new substance when received by the audience. None of these exchanges occurred in complete passivity of any one party present in the performative space. Consequently, the emergent emotion of nationhood developed as a nuanced image of ‘self’. This book has tried to locate the beginning of that emotion of national ‘self’.

About the Author

Mimasha Pandit, Assistant Professor in the History Department of Mankar College, Mankar, Burdwan.  She was awarded PhD degree from the University of Calcutta. Her area of research was the performance/emotional history of early twentieth century Bengal. She worked upon the popular performative media of Bengal (theatre, jatra and songs) to locate the emotional bond/nationhood engendered among the Bengali public.

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Table of contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction: In Search of An Emotional History of Swadeshi Bengal

  1. Inventing Indigeneity: A Storehouse of Collective Memory
  2. Community of Emotion: In Search of a Swadeshi Public
  3. Community of Felt Emotions: Birth of an Imagined National ‘Self’
  4. Violence and Nationhood: Unearthing the Hidden Transcript of Resistance
  5. Oppressed ‘Self/Selves’: Emotional Roots of Nationalism

 

Epilogue

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Read More