Not War, Not Peace

Motivating Pakistan to Prevent Cross-Border Terrorism

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ISBN:

9780199467495

Publication date:

30/06/2016

Hardback

310 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199467495

Publication date:

30/06/2016

Hardback

310 pages

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

India confronts an exceptionally difficult national security problem: how to motivate Pakistan to prevent cross-border terrorism. Not War, Not Peace? examines India’s options in developing an effective strategy. Drawing on extensive interviews with senior serving and retired Indian and Pakistani officials, it provides rigorous analysis of India’s options to motivate Pakistan’s behaviour while staying left of nuclear ‘boom’.

Rights:  World Rights

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

Description

The Mumbai blasts of 1993, the attack on the Indian Parliament in 2001, Mumbai 26/11—cross-border terrorism has continued unabated. What can India do to motivate Pakistan to do more to prevent such attacks? In the nuclear times that we live in, where a military counter-attack could escalate to destruction beyond imagination, overt warfare is clearly not an option.
But since outright peacemaking seems similarly infeasible, what combination of coercive pressure and bargaining could lead to peace? The authors provide, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the violent and non-violent options available to India for compelling Pakistan to take concrete steps towards curbing terrorism originating in its homeland. They draw on extensive interviews with senior Indian and Pakistani officials, in service and retired, to explore the challenges involved in compellence and to show how non-violent coercion combined with clarity on the economic, social, and reputational costs of terrorism can better motivate Pakistan to pacify groups involved in cross-border terrorism.
Not War, Not Peace? goes beyond the much discussed theories of nuclear deterrence and counterterrorism strategy to explore a new approach to resolving old conflicts.
About the Author
George Perkovich is Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
Toby Dalton is Co-Director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

Table of contents


Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
1. The Decision-Making Setting
2. Proactive Strategy
3. Air Power
4. Covert Operations
5. Nuclear Capabilities
6. Non-Violent Compellence
Conclusion
Index
About the Authors

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

Features

  • It draws on interviews with exceptionally high-level recent Indian officials and retired leaders of the Pakistani nuclear establishment and ISI.
  • For international relations and international security scholars, the book fills a void between two sets of literature: studies of nuclear deterrence (which do not factor in the triggering role of terrorism) and studies of terrorism (which do not factor in the role of nuclear deterrence/compellence).
  • There is no other rigorous analytical study in one volume of India’s various coercive options and their escalatory dynamics and feasibility, taking into account likely Pakistani counter-moves.
  • There is no comparable discussion of India’s non-violent options for compelling Pakistan, as occurs in this volume.

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

George Perkovich & Toby Dalton

Description

The Mumbai blasts of 1993, the attack on the Indian Parliament in 2001, Mumbai 26/11—cross-border terrorism has continued unabated. What can India do to motivate Pakistan to do more to prevent such attacks? In the nuclear times that we live in, where a military counter-attack could escalate to destruction beyond imagination, overt warfare is clearly not an option.
But since outright peacemaking seems similarly infeasible, what combination of coercive pressure and bargaining could lead to peace? The authors provide, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the violent and non-violent options available to India for compelling Pakistan to take concrete steps towards curbing terrorism originating in its homeland. They draw on extensive interviews with senior Indian and Pakistani officials, in service and retired, to explore the challenges involved in compellence and to show how non-violent coercion combined with clarity on the economic, social, and reputational costs of terrorism can better motivate Pakistan to pacify groups involved in cross-border terrorism.
Not War, Not Peace? goes beyond the much discussed theories of nuclear deterrence and counterterrorism strategy to explore a new approach to resolving old conflicts.
About the Author
George Perkovich is Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
Toby Dalton is Co-Director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

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Table of contents


Preface
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
1. The Decision-Making Setting
2. Proactive Strategy
3. Air Power
4. Covert Operations
5. Nuclear Capabilities
6. Non-Violent Compellence
Conclusion
Index
About the Authors

Read More