Narrow Fairways

Getting By & Falling Behind in the New India

Price: 1100.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780197508602

Publication date:

30/10/2019

Hardback

322 pages

235.0x156.0mm

Price: 1100.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780197508602

Publication date:

30/10/2019

Hardback

322 pages

235.0x156.0mm

Patrick Inglis

Rights:  OUP USA (INDIAN TERRITORY)

Patrick Inglis

Description

India remains a country mired in poverty, with two-thirds of its 1.3 billion people living on little more than a few dollars a day. Just as telling, the country's informal working population numbers nearly 500 million, or approximately eighty percent of the entire labor force. Despite these figures and the related structural disadvantages that imperil the lives of so many, the Indian elite maintain that the poor need only work harder and they, too, can become rich. The results of this ambitious ten-year ethnography at exclusive golf clubs in Bangalore shatter such self-serving illusions. In Narrow Fairways, Patrick Inglis combines participant observation, interviews, and archival research to show how social mobility among the poor lower-caste golf caddies who carry the golf sets of wealthy upper-caste members at these clubs is ultimately constrained and narrowed. The book highlights how elites secure and extend class and caste privileges, while also delivering a necessary rebuke to India's present development strategy, which pays far too little attention to promoting quality healthcare, education, and other basic social services that would deliver real opportunities to the poor.

Patrick Inglis

Table of contents

Note to Readers 
Dramatis Personae 
Map of City & Clubs 

Introduction 
Part One: Labor and Land 
1: The "Caddie Question" 
2: Under Construction: The Making of Elite Ideology 
Part Two: Servility, Deference, and Place
3: The Labor of Aspiration 
4: The Boys of Banandur
5: Caste Illa 
Part Three: Opportunity Costs
6: The Burden of Distinction 
7: "It Will Become": Twists of Fate 
8: Going Places 
Part Four: Getting By, Falling Behind
9: Escape from Challaghatta 
10: The (Mis)Fortunes of Ordinary Men 
11: On the Path of Development 
Conclusion 
Acknowledgments 
Notes 
Index

Patrick Inglis

Features

  • Provides an ethnographic study of social mobility in India, tracking golf caddies and their families struggle for a period of ten years
  • Argues that the interactions between the rich and poor matter in advancing or limiting prospects for the poor, contributing to the study of elites and their role in perpetuating social inequality

Patrick Inglis

Review

"Inglis's book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on the emergent Indian middle class. With great sensitivity, Inglis shows both how economic liberalization in recent decades has created aspirations of upward mobility, and how the actual spaces for that mobility are closely guarded by the Indian elites. The book demonstrates the possibility of combining analytical acuity with deep compassion. It is a significant achievement." -Vivek Chibber, New York University

"In this careful and heartfelt account of golf caddies and club members in India's Silicon Valley, Patrick Inglis gives us a rare inside look at the intimate politics of social mobility and class reproduction in millennial India. Inglis reminds us, with fresh insight, that aspiration and mobility are a matter of life and death. Among the rich and the poor, we see how neoliberal logics have eroded away basic human empathy in favor of a status quo that rewards the wealthy indiscriminately. A compelling, page-turning, important book." -Smitha Radhakrishnan, Associate Professor of Sociology, Wellesley College

"A beautifully written glimpse into the intimate and brutal practices of social inequality reproduction, played out inside-and in the back alleys of-India's most elite golf clubs." -Michael Goldman, University of Minnesota, and author of Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization

Patrick Inglis

Description

India remains a country mired in poverty, with two-thirds of its 1.3 billion people living on little more than a few dollars a day. Just as telling, the country's informal working population numbers nearly 500 million, or approximately eighty percent of the entire labor force. Despite these figures and the related structural disadvantages that imperil the lives of so many, the Indian elite maintain that the poor need only work harder and they, too, can become rich. The results of this ambitious ten-year ethnography at exclusive golf clubs in Bangalore shatter such self-serving illusions. In Narrow Fairways, Patrick Inglis combines participant observation, interviews, and archival research to show how social mobility among the poor lower-caste golf caddies who carry the golf sets of wealthy upper-caste members at these clubs is ultimately constrained and narrowed. The book highlights how elites secure and extend class and caste privileges, while also delivering a necessary rebuke to India's present development strategy, which pays far too little attention to promoting quality healthcare, education, and other basic social services that would deliver real opportunities to the poor.

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Reviews

"Inglis's book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on the emergent Indian middle class. With great sensitivity, Inglis shows both how economic liberalization in recent decades has created aspirations of upward mobility, and how the actual spaces for that mobility are closely guarded by the Indian elites. The book demonstrates the possibility of combining analytical acuity with deep compassion. It is a significant achievement." -Vivek Chibber, New York University

"In this careful and heartfelt account of golf caddies and club members in India's Silicon Valley, Patrick Inglis gives us a rare inside look at the intimate politics of social mobility and class reproduction in millennial India. Inglis reminds us, with fresh insight, that aspiration and mobility are a matter of life and death. Among the rich and the poor, we see how neoliberal logics have eroded away basic human empathy in favor of a status quo that rewards the wealthy indiscriminately. A compelling, page-turning, important book." -Smitha Radhakrishnan, Associate Professor of Sociology, Wellesley College

"A beautifully written glimpse into the intimate and brutal practices of social inequality reproduction, played out inside-and in the back alleys of-India's most elite golf clubs." -Michael Goldman, University of Minnesota, and author of Imperial Nature: The World Bank and Struggles for Social Justice in the Age of Globalization

Read More

Table of contents

Note to Readers 
Dramatis Personae 
Map of City & Clubs 

Introduction 
Part One: Labor and Land 
1: The "Caddie Question" 
2: Under Construction: The Making of Elite Ideology 
Part Two: Servility, Deference, and Place
3: The Labor of Aspiration 
4: The Boys of Banandur
5: Caste Illa 
Part Three: Opportunity Costs
6: The Burden of Distinction 
7: "It Will Become": Twists of Fate 
8: Going Places 
Part Four: Getting By, Falling Behind
9: Escape from Challaghatta 
10: The (Mis)Fortunes of Ordinary Men 
11: On the Path of Development 
Conclusion 
Acknowledgments 
Notes 
Index

Read More