Krishna’s Playground

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ISBN:

9780190123987

Publication date:

10/01/2020

Paperback

382 pages

216.0x140.0mm

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780190123987

Publication date:

10/01/2020

Paperback

382 pages

216.0x140.0mm

John Stratton Hawley

Located at a dramatic bend in the River Yamuna, a hundred miles from the center of Delhi, Vrindavan is the spot where the god Krishna is believed to have spent his childhood and youth. For Hindus it has always stood for youth writ large. Now, though, the world is gobbling up Vrindavan. Half the town is a vast real-estate development—and the waters of the Yamuna are too polluted to drink or even bathe in. Temples now style themselves as theme parks, and the world’s tallest religious building is under construction in Krishna’s pastoral paradise.

Like our age as a whole, Vrindavan throbs with feisty energy, but is it the religious canary in our collective coal mine?

Rights:  World Rights

John Stratton Hawley

Description

This is a book about a deeply beloved place—many call it the spiritual capital of India. Located at a dramatic bend in the River Yamuna, a hundred miles from the center of Delhi, Vrindavan is the spot where the god Krishna is believed to have spent his childhood and youth. For Hindus it has always stood for youth writ large—a realm of love and beauty that enables one to retreat from the weight and harshness of the world. Now, though, the world is gobbling up Vrindavan. Delhi’s megalopolitan sprawl inches closer day by day—half the town is a vast real-estate development—and the waters of the Yamuna are too polluted to drink or even bathe in. Temples now style themselves as theme parks, and the world’s tallest religious building is under construction in Krishna’s pastoral paradise.

What happens when the Anthropocene Age makes everything virtual? What happens when heaven gets plowed under? Like our age as a whole, Vrindavan throbs with feisty energy, but is it the religious canary in our collective coal mine?

About the Author

John Stratton Hawley is Claire Tow Professor of Religion at Barnard College, Columbia University.

John Stratton Hawley

Table of contents

Acknowledgments xi

Note on the Text xv

Map of Vrindavan xx

  1. Paradise—Lost? 1
  2. The Battle of Keshi Ghat 22
  3. Mall of Vrindavan 62
  4. The Skyscraper Temple 118
  5. A Diff erent Refuge for Women 178
  6. Being Shrivatsa 218
  7. The Sign of Our Times 266

Notes 298

Bibliography 333

Index 351

About the Author 360

John Stratton Hawley

John Stratton Hawley

Review

Beautifully written, with boundless love and compassion for its subject, Krishna's Playground fills the reader with dread and foreboding not only about what awaits Vrindavan but our entire planet. Hawley has successfully turned Vrindavan into an allegory of the entire world.

—Rajeev Bhargava, Professor, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi

No one but Jack Hawley could have written this book, making full use of his lifetime of deep immersion in Vrindavan, another lifetime of scholarship on the history of Hinduism, and a third as a great translator of the sacred texts of the worship of Krishna. He narrates this complex story with a captivating simplicity and clarity that make the reader see why this story matters so very much to him.

—Wendy Doniger, Mircea Eliade Distinguished Service Professor Emerita of the History of Religions, The University of Chicago

John Stratton Hawley

Description

This is a book about a deeply beloved place—many call it the spiritual capital of India. Located at a dramatic bend in the River Yamuna, a hundred miles from the center of Delhi, Vrindavan is the spot where the god Krishna is believed to have spent his childhood and youth. For Hindus it has always stood for youth writ large—a realm of love and beauty that enables one to retreat from the weight and harshness of the world. Now, though, the world is gobbling up Vrindavan. Delhi’s megalopolitan sprawl inches closer day by day—half the town is a vast real-estate development—and the waters of the Yamuna are too polluted to drink or even bathe in. Temples now style themselves as theme parks, and the world’s tallest religious building is under construction in Krishna’s pastoral paradise.

What happens when the Anthropocene Age makes everything virtual? What happens when heaven gets plowed under? Like our age as a whole, Vrindavan throbs with feisty energy, but is it the religious canary in our collective coal mine?

About the Author

John Stratton Hawley is Claire Tow Professor of Religion at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Read More

Reviews

Beautifully written, with boundless love and compassion for its subject, Krishna's Playground fills the reader with dread and foreboding not only about what awaits Vrindavan but our entire planet. Hawley has successfully turned Vrindavan into an allegory of the entire world.

—Rajeev Bhargava, Professor, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi

No one but Jack Hawley could have written this book, making full use of his lifetime of deep immersion in Vrindavan, another lifetime of scholarship on the history of Hinduism, and a third as a great translator of the sacred texts of the worship of Krishna. He narrates this complex story with a captivating simplicity and clarity that make the reader see why this story matters so very much to him.

—Wendy Doniger, Mircea Eliade Distinguished Service Professor Emerita of the History of Religions, The University of Chicago

Read More

Table of contents

Acknowledgments xi

Note on the Text xv

Map of Vrindavan xx

  1. Paradise—Lost? 1
  2. The Battle of Keshi Ghat 22
  3. Mall of Vrindavan 62
  4. The Skyscraper Temple 118
  5. A Diff erent Refuge for Women 178
  6. Being Shrivatsa 218
  7. The Sign of Our Times 266

Notes 298

Bibliography 333

Index 351

About the Author 360

Read More