Clients and Constituents

Political Responsiveness in Patronage Democracies

Price: 1100.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780190082109

Publication date:

10/06/2019

Hardback

390 pages

235.0x156.0mm

Price: 1100.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780190082109

Publication date:

10/06/2019

Hardback

390 pages

235.0x156.0mm

Jennifer Bussell

Rights:  OUP USA (INDIAN TERRITORY)

Jennifer Bussell

Description

Scholars of distributive politics often emphasize partisanship and clientelism. However, as Jennifer Bussell demonstrates in Clients and Constituents, legislators in "patronage democracies" also provide substantial constituency service: non-contingent, direct assistance to individual citizens. Bussell shows how the uneven character of access to services at the local level-often due to biased allocation on the part of local intermediaries-generates demand for help from higher-level officials. The nature of these appeals in turn provides incentives for politicians to help their constituents obtain public benefits. Drawing on a new cross-national dataset and extensive evidence from India-including sustained qualitative shadowing of politicians, novel elite and citizen surveys, and an experimental audit study with a near census of Indian state and national legislators-this book provides a theoretical and empirical examination of political responsiveness in developing countries. It highlights the potential for an under-appreciated form of democratic accountability, one that is however rooted in the character of patronage-based politics.

About the Author

Jennifer Bussell is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. She studies comparative politics with an emphasis on the political economy of development, democratic representation, and governance outcomes, principally in South Asia and Africa. She is also the author of Corruption and Reform In India: Public Services in the Digital Age.

Jennifer Bussell

Table of contents

List of Tables 
List of Figures 
Preface 
Acknowledgements 


PART I - The Puzzle of Constituency Service 
1) Introduction: Representation, Distribution, and Constituency Service 
2) Political Responsiveness in a Patronage Democracy 
3) The Provision of Constituency Service 

PART II - The Sources of Constituency Service 
4) Clients or Constituents? A Theory of Assistance in Patronage Democracies 
5) Access to Services in a Patronage Democracy: The Case of India 
6) Partisan Targeting and Local Distributive Politics 
7) Local Blocking and Appeals for Assistance 
8) Partisanship, the Personal Vote, and Constituency Service 
9) Which Politicians Respond? 
10) When is Responsiveness Partisan Bias? 

Part III - The Significance of Constituency Service 
11) Constituency Service in Comparative Perspective 
12) Constrained Accountability in Patronage Democracies 

Bibliography 
Appendix

Jennifer Bussell

Features

  • Offers a new view on the character of representation and distributive politics in patronage democracies
  • Includes an audit experiment with nearly all of India's state and national legislators, the first and largest of its kind
  • Provides reports and evidence from in-depth, intensive shadowing of state and local politicians across multiple Indian states
  • Draws on substantial additional empirical materials, including nested surveys of citizens and elites in three Indian states, additional nationwide and cross-national surveys, and administrative data on constituency-level spending

Jennifer Bussell

Review

"Students of developing countries often see lines of people waiting outside of politicians' doors. Clients and Constituents provides the most complete and insightful treatment to date of exactly what these people are doing, what it means for representation, and how the phenomenon fits within the broader ambit of politics in patronage democracies. It is a book about constituency service in India, but it offers important contributions to-and should be read by students of-Comparative Politics more broadly." Daniel N. Posner, James S. Coleman Professor of International Development, University of California, Los Angeles

"Bussell's argument is a serious corrective for a view that sees politician in developing countries enmeshed in patronage networks. Instead, her carefully marshaled evidence shows how higher-level politicians help make democracy more inclusive and more easily accessed by ordinary citizens." Anirudh Krishna, Edgar T. Thompson Professor of Public Policy and Political Science, Duke University

"Jennifer Bussell's fascinating book demonstrates why constituency service is central for understanding representation in Indian politics. Using an impressive array of evidence and in contrast to much of the prevailing literature, Bussell shows that often elected officials deliver service without targeting specific voters. This fascinating book breaks new theoretical and empirical grounds and provides a fundamentally important contribution to the study of representation across democracies." Justin Grimmer, Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

"Ever wondered what Indian politicians actually do? OK, maybe you haven't, but Jennifer Bussell has, and she's watched them do it, and it turns out to reveal something deep about clientelism and comparative politics. It's all here in this remarkable book which gets to the roots of who is actually represented in a democracy." James A. Robinson, University of Chicago

Jennifer Bussell

Description

Scholars of distributive politics often emphasize partisanship and clientelism. However, as Jennifer Bussell demonstrates in Clients and Constituents, legislators in "patronage democracies" also provide substantial constituency service: non-contingent, direct assistance to individual citizens. Bussell shows how the uneven character of access to services at the local level-often due to biased allocation on the part of local intermediaries-generates demand for help from higher-level officials. The nature of these appeals in turn provides incentives for politicians to help their constituents obtain public benefits. Drawing on a new cross-national dataset and extensive evidence from India-including sustained qualitative shadowing of politicians, novel elite and citizen surveys, and an experimental audit study with a near census of Indian state and national legislators-this book provides a theoretical and empirical examination of political responsiveness in developing countries. It highlights the potential for an under-appreciated form of democratic accountability, one that is however rooted in the character of patronage-based politics.

About the Author

Jennifer Bussell is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. She studies comparative politics with an emphasis on the political economy of development, democratic representation, and governance outcomes, principally in South Asia and Africa. She is also the author of Corruption and Reform In India: Public Services in the Digital Age.

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Reviews

"Students of developing countries often see lines of people waiting outside of politicians' doors. Clients and Constituents provides the most complete and insightful treatment to date of exactly what these people are doing, what it means for representation, and how the phenomenon fits within the broader ambit of politics in patronage democracies. It is a book about constituency service in India, but it offers important contributions to-and should be read by students of-Comparative Politics more broadly." Daniel N. Posner, James S. Coleman Professor of International Development, University of California, Los Angeles

"Bussell's argument is a serious corrective for a view that sees politician in developing countries enmeshed in patronage networks. Instead, her carefully marshaled evidence shows how higher-level politicians help make democracy more inclusive and more easily accessed by ordinary citizens." Anirudh Krishna, Edgar T. Thompson Professor of Public Policy and Political Science, Duke University

"Jennifer Bussell's fascinating book demonstrates why constituency service is central for understanding representation in Indian politics. Using an impressive array of evidence and in contrast to much of the prevailing literature, Bussell shows that often elected officials deliver service without targeting specific voters. This fascinating book breaks new theoretical and empirical grounds and provides a fundamentally important contribution to the study of representation across democracies." Justin Grimmer, Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

"Ever wondered what Indian politicians actually do? OK, maybe you haven't, but Jennifer Bussell has, and she's watched them do it, and it turns out to reveal something deep about clientelism and comparative politics. It's all here in this remarkable book which gets to the roots of who is actually represented in a democracy." James A. Robinson, University of Chicago

Read More

Table of contents

List of Tables 
List of Figures 
Preface 
Acknowledgements 


PART I - The Puzzle of Constituency Service 
1) Introduction: Representation, Distribution, and Constituency Service 
2) Political Responsiveness in a Patronage Democracy 
3) The Provision of Constituency Service 

PART II - The Sources of Constituency Service 
4) Clients or Constituents? A Theory of Assistance in Patronage Democracies 
5) Access to Services in a Patronage Democracy: The Case of India 
6) Partisan Targeting and Local Distributive Politics 
7) Local Blocking and Appeals for Assistance 
8) Partisanship, the Personal Vote, and Constituency Service 
9) Which Politicians Respond? 
10) When is Responsiveness Partisan Bias? 

Part III - The Significance of Constituency Service 
11) Constituency Service in Comparative Perspective 
12) Constrained Accountability in Patronage Democracies 

Bibliography 
Appendix

Read More