An Endangered History

Indigeneity, Religion, and Politics on the Borders of India, Burma, and Bangladesh

Price: 1195.00 INR

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ISBN:

9780199493081

Publication date:

15/06/2019

Hardback

332 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Price: 1195.00 INR

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199493081

Publication date:

15/06/2019

Hardback

332 pages

216.0x140.0mm

Angma Dey Jhala

This book investigates how British administrators from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries used European systems of knowledge, such as botany, natural history, gender, enumerative statistics, and anthropology, to construct the indigenous communities of the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) and their landscapes. In the process, they connected the region to a dynamic, global map, and classified its peoples through the reifying language of religion, linguistics, race, and nation.

Rights:  World Rights

Angma Dey Jhala

Description

An Endangered History examines the transcultural, colonial history of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, c. 1798–1947. This little-studied borderland region lies on the crossroads of Bangladesh, India, and Burma and is inhabited by several indigenous peoples. They observe a diversity of religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, animism, and Christianity; speak Tibeto-Burmese dialects intermixed with Persian and Bengali idioms; and practise jhum or slash-and-burn agriculture.

This book investigates how British administrators from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries used European systems of knowledge, such as botany, natural history, gender, enumerative statistics, and anthropology, to construct these indigenous communities and their landscapes. In the process, they connected the region to a dynamic, global map, and classified its peoples through the reifying language of religion, linguistics, race, and nation.

About the Author

Angma Dey Jhala is an associate professor of history at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA.

Angma Dey Jhala

Table of contents

List of Figures, Tables, and Maps

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Border Histories and Border Crossings in the

Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bengal

 

  1. ‘Promiscuous’ Planting: Francis Buchanan’s Botanical Explorations of 1798
  1. ‘Beware Oh Petticoats! There Be Leeches in These Parts’: Reading Gender, Indigeneity, and Tribal Authority in T.H. Lewin’s Archive, c. 1864–75
  2. Measuring Tribal ‘Otherness’: Colonial Enumeration, Religion, and Governmentality, c. 1876–1909
  1. The Administrator (as) Anthropologist: Reinventing Tribal

Chiefs as Indian Princes in J.P. Mills’s 1926–7 Tour Diary, Report, and Proposals

 

Epilogue

Works Cited

Index

About the Author

Angma Dey Jhala

Angma Dey Jhala

Angma Dey Jhala

Description

An Endangered History examines the transcultural, colonial history of the Chittagong Hill Tracts, c. 1798–1947. This little-studied borderland region lies on the crossroads of Bangladesh, India, and Burma and is inhabited by several indigenous peoples. They observe a diversity of religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, animism, and Christianity; speak Tibeto-Burmese dialects intermixed with Persian and Bengali idioms; and practise jhum or slash-and-burn agriculture.

This book investigates how British administrators from the eighteenth to mid-twentieth centuries used European systems of knowledge, such as botany, natural history, gender, enumerative statistics, and anthropology, to construct these indigenous communities and their landscapes. In the process, they connected the region to a dynamic, global map, and classified its peoples through the reifying language of religion, linguistics, race, and nation.

About the Author

Angma Dey Jhala is an associate professor of history at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts, USA.

Read More

Table of contents

List of Figures, Tables, and Maps

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Border Histories and Border Crossings in the

Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bengal

 

  1. ‘Promiscuous’ Planting: Francis Buchanan’s Botanical Explorations of 1798
  1. ‘Beware Oh Petticoats! There Be Leeches in These Parts’: Reading Gender, Indigeneity, and Tribal Authority in T.H. Lewin’s Archive, c. 1864–75
  2. Measuring Tribal ‘Otherness’: Colonial Enumeration, Religion, and Governmentality, c. 1876–1909
  1. The Administrator (as) Anthropologist: Reinventing Tribal

Chiefs as Indian Princes in J.P. Mills’s 1926–7 Tour Diary, Report, and Proposals

 

Epilogue

Works Cited

Index

About the Author

Read More